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#11 Bombsight

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Posted 14 June 2016 - 12:47 AM

Canon 5D M4 or Canon 60D (Budget) with a Canon 16-35L mm Wide angle.

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#12 Kodachrome

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 01:33 AM

I have shot entire magazine articles with an iPhone just for the unique look ( sharp, great color and lively depth of field ) and in contrast I did an article for the New York Times on Saturday, used a Leica M digital with a 35mm 1.4 and a Nikon D750 with an 85mm 1.8, so it really boils down to the task at hand and the look you want. 

 

For landscapes I am generally shooting black and white film on medium or large format but if I need to do color, I use a Nikon D810 or better yet, a Hasselblad CFV50c digital back. 

 

If you do happen to go the non-SLR route and get one of many enticing affordable compact cameras with the built in lens, just consider battery life, they are often not too great where as a lot of Canon and Nikon SLRs with interchangeable lenses are usually excellent in that regard. 

 

Also, a plug for Nikon.....the system is huge and since it is still based on a lens mount dating back to 1959, there are a TON of great lenses to be had for it new and used. I routinely use cheap to find lenses like the 28mm 2.0 and 105mm 2.5 on the D810 to great effect.

 

So based on what you have described, I would get a Nikon D750, remote release and the vertical grip. Then for lenses I would get the 24-120 F4 VR and a 28mm 1.8 for the aurora shots. I'd wait to see what you like on the long end for wildlife since that is where the price and weight can add up fast. When it comes to wildlife, I don't do very much of it but when I do, it is usually in the range of 50-100mm since much longer than that and you are just making another one of billions of "mug shots" of said animal with no real narrative or context, why add to that mediocrity, right? 

 

To understand what I mean about the latter, check out the work of Frans Lanting, Jim Brandenburg or my good friend Michael Nichols, lots of wide angle to normal shots. 

 

Tons of beta out there, lots of hype from the internet gear review star set so brace your self for that...and good luck...:-)


Edited by Kodachrome, 21 June 2016 - 02:18 AM.

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#13 Lighthawk

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 03:50 AM

 

To understand what I mean about the latter, check out the work of Frans Lanting, Jim Brandenburg or my good friend Michael Nichols, lots of wide angle to normal shots. 

 

We had the pleasure of viewing Frans Lanting's work at the Smithsonian when we went back East in April.  Great stuff.

Environmental vs. mug shots is an interesting dichotomy.  Getting really close is not always an option  ;)


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#14 Bigfoot

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 07:47 PM

Hi,

 

I am looking to start taking more landscape/animal photos and was wondering if anyone had suggestions for camera/lens needed to start.

 

I have a Fuji xp60 that I carry for fishing and backpacking that I like because of the waterproof aspect.

 

I also have an old Nikon FG-20, but I'm not really into the film and developing hassle so would prefer a digital SLR for my next camera.

 

I would also want something that could be used for photos of the Aurora this winter.

 

Thanks

 

Take a look at the Fujifilm X-T2 (pre-order). A review by Karen Hutton. If I was building a new system this would probably be my choice. It should do great with auroras. As it is I use Micro Four Thirds (Olympus and Lumix) with which I am happy. Third choice if I had to have full-frame would be the Sony a7R II. 


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#15 Bigfoot

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 03:19 PM

Here's another fun read about a film shooter progressing to digital. Also loving the Fujifilm X100T (similar to the X-T but with a fixed lens). 

 

"Once you’ve gotten the Id, the Ego, and the Superego out of the way, photographers’ personalities can be further distilled into three subcategories: your Poseur, your Old Poop, and your Shooter." 


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#16 Wandering Sagebrush

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 06:38 PM

We had the pleasure of viewing Frans Lanting's work at the Smithsonian when we went back East in April.  Great stuff.
Environmental vs. mug shots is an interesting dichotomy.  Getting really close is not always an option  ;)


He presented at NPPNW (Nature Photographers of the Pacific Northwest) a couple of years back. An interesting person. Barry Lopez (Arctic Dreams) was in the audience too. Quite a pair.
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#17 CraggyMan

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Posted 02 August 2016 - 06:52 PM

I recently rented a Sony A6300 from Borrowlens.com for a backpacking trip in NE Oregon. My first experience with a lightweight/compact/interchangeable lens mirrorless system.  For sure if I did more of these kind of trips I would look seriously at this system. The weight-savings was pretty remarkable but a caveat for sure is battery power. Without a solar charger for long trips away from the power grid you would need to carry multiple batteries for any kind of serious shooting with longer exposures, etc.. The Fuji system looks intriguing as it has much more manual controls, I found the multiple menus of the Sony pretty baffling. I'm sure with more time to sort out the camera one could find some setups to stick with to minimize the scrolling around.

At this point in time my workhorse Nikon DSlR and their lens array are just too time tested for me to switch.


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#18 munchmeister

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Posted 03 August 2016 - 01:12 AM

Panasonic Lumix GX8. Micro four thirds sensor, interchangeable lenses. Many useful freaturs such as time lapse capability (for those auroras), very useful clip video function, articulating LCD screen and electronic viewfinder that twists up. Many more features. Google it.
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#19 Bigfoot

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Posted 05 August 2016 - 07:05 PM

I recently rented a Sony A6300 from Borrowlens.com for a backpacking trip in NE Oregon. My first experience with a lightweight/compact/interchangeable lens mirrorless system.  For sure if I did more of these kind of trips I would look seriously at this system. The weight-savings was pretty remarkable but a caveat for sure is battery power. Without a solar charger for long trips away from the power grid you would need to carry multiple batteries for any kind of serious shooting with longer exposures, etc.. The Fuji system looks intriguing as it has much more manual controls, I found the multiple menus of the Sony pretty baffling. I'm sure with more time to sort out the camera one could find some setups to stick with to minimize the scrolling around.

At this point in time my workhorse Nikon DSlR and their lens array are just too time tested for me to switch.

 

A mirrorless camera battery weighs 2 to 3 oz depending on model, so it is not a problem to carry several (or use a battery grip) on an extended trip. Many variables in battery life. I get 300 to 2000 images depending on conditions. Sony tends to use a less powerful battery whereas Fuji, Lumix and Olympus use bigger ones. The Lumix GH4 has a 1860 mAh battery that lasts a long time. In any case more powerful aftermarket batteries are usually available if you need them. 

 

Yes, the Sony menu system sucks. Actually, they all do. Camera features have gotten very complicated and the manufacturers are terrible at user interface. Assorted manual controls, programmable buttons and touch screens add to the confusion. I eventually found what works for me but everyone is different. 


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#20 munchmeister

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Posted 06 August 2016 - 09:51 PM

My favorite camera these days is my Nikon AW130. DSLRs stay at home in the case while I'm playing with this. It has some built in timelapse functions that are just plain fun.

 

Titles added later, but the video is just with the sun setting. Point and shoot, on a tripod, the camera does the rest! Just push the shutter and come back later, movie is ready to be played.

 

https://photos.smugm...armWind-640.mp4

 

5 timelapse settings, Cityscape, Landscape, Sunset, Night Sky and Star Trails. Lots of fun.


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