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Four Wheel Hallmark f-150

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#11 Advmoto18

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 11:07 AM

Since you mentioned you pull your horse trailer all over ID, I assume you are contemplating pulling the trailer with the camper installed as well?

 

If that is the case....

You should look at the Ford charts and graphs and see where the torque curve is relative to engine RPM.  If you are constantly operating the truck's engine in the top 1/4 of the RPM band to pull the trailer and the payload in the bed, your engine's life span will be greatly reduced.  Gas engines simply aren't designed to constantly operate in this range.  Not only are you generating a lot of RPM, but exhaust heat as well.  Even more so with the twin turbos.  Gas engine EGT is not nearly as critical as monitoring diesel EGT.

 

Another factor to consider, your 10 speed transmission is going to be constantly shifting (even more so then when simply pulling the trailer) to maintain chip parameters.  Not a bad thing, just something that can get a bit annoying on long trips listening to the tranny shift at any slight grade change.

 

For what you're trying to accomplish, is why many folks prefer a diesel engine/truck.  Heavy payloads, towing heavy loads are what diesel trucks are designed for....    I'm NOT suggesting you go off and buy a new diesel truck!

 

Ask around and find a reputable truck upfitter in your region.  I'd drive over and have a chat with them.   


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South Carolina Low Country.  Whatyanogood?


#12 thisisepic

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 01:10 PM

Since you mentioned you pull your horse trailer all over ID, I assume you are contemplating pulling the trailer with the camper installed as well?

 

If that is the case....

You should look at the Ford charts and graphs and see where the torque curve is relative to engine RPM.  If you are constantly operating the truck's engine in the top 1/4 of the RPM band to pull the trailer and the payload in the bed, your engine's life span will be greatly reduced.  Gas engines simply aren't designed to constantly operate in this range.  Not only are you generating a lot of RPM, but exhaust heat as well.  Even more so with the twin turbos.  Gas engine EGT is not nearly as critical as monitoring diesel EGT.

 

Another factor to consider, your 10 speed transmission is going to be constantly shifting (even more so then when simply pulling the trailer) to maintain chip parameters.  Not a bad thing, just something that can get a bit annoying on long trips listening to the tranny shift at any slight grade change.

 

For what you're trying to accomplish, is why many folks prefer a diesel engine/truck.  Heavy payloads, towing heavy loads are what diesel trucks are designed for....    I'm NOT suggesting you go off and buy a new diesel truck!

 

Ask around and find a reputable truck upfitter in your region.  I'd drive over and have a chat with them.   

this is really great advice. makes sense. i have the max tow package and i was thinking about seeing if there was a way to approximate the heavy payload package on the truck (can't hurt to ask). i'll start with your suggestion.


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#13 shellback

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 01:23 PM

Now about the length of the camper and the tongue length of your trailer? Are you going to need an extended hitch for clearance between the camper and horse trailer? There are different limits to towing capacities when you move the hitch point back. 


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#14 Mickey Bitsko

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 03:56 PM

Shellback...
Are you a son or daughter of King Neptune?
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#15 thisisepic

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 04:11 PM

Now about the length of the camper and the tongue length of your trailer? Are you going to need an extended hitch for clearance between the camper and horse trailer? There are different limits to towing capacities when you move the hitch point back. 

thanks shellback. that's another factor... the overhang would be about a foot, so i'd need an 18" extension to be safe with corners and backing. my understanding is that you can expect to lose about 50% of your tow capacity with an 18"extension. i'm starting to think that with my current setup, i'm pushing it with the horse trailer and truck camper. either/or would be ok, but both may be a stretch.


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#16 Kolockum

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 04:29 PM

I don't think you would need a extension. The Raven is 70" + 2" for the bummers at the front = 72" or 6' total and your bed is 5'6". There should be around 6" from the end of the bed to the end of the bumper (don't forget to include the width of your tailgate). So I don't think the camper will interfere with the trailer. Although if you are going to tow a lot I would put anti-slip tape on the trailer tongue so you can use it as a step into the camper. 

 

I used to have a 02 Dodge Dakota with a V6 and an Eagle that I lived out of. Just be good with your space. Having an extended cab or larger is nice for storage if the camper gets tight. Put 1200 lbs (simulate 950 lb camper +250 lbs worth of gear) in the back of your truck and tow your trailer. That should give you a good idea if your truck can handle it. If you want to mimic the air flow stick a 4x8 sheet of plywood in the crack between the cab and bed... Oh wait that is only for hard-sided campers... :P


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#17 thisisepic

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 05:17 PM

I don't think you would need a extension. The Raven is 70" + 2" for the bummers at the front = 72" or 6' total and your bed is 5'6". There should be around 6" from the end of the bed to the end of the bumper (don't forget to include the width of your tailgate). So I don't think the camper will interfere with the trailer. Although if you are going to tow a lot I would put anti-slip tape on the trailer tongue so you can use it as a step into the camper. 

 

I used to have a 02 Dodge Dakota with a V6 and an Eagle that I lived out of. Just be good with your space. Having an extended cab or larger is nice for storage if the camper gets tight. Put 1200 lbs (simulate 950 lb camper +250 lbs worth of gear) in the back of your truck and tow your trailer. That should give you a good idea if your truck can handle it. If you want to mimic the air flow stick a 4x8 sheet of plywood in the crack between the cab and bed... Oh wait that is only for hard-sided campers... :P

you're right. i was using the hallmark exc 6.5 foot dimension, but the raven would work much better. i have a super crew, which gives a ton of room in the back for storage. i've hauled with three dogs and gear in the cab and still had room. thanks kolockum!


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#18 enelson

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 12:59 PM

I sold our Hallmark K2 to a guy with an aluminum F-150.  His was a 6.5' bed with my 8' K2.  It worked but is pushing it on the payload.  I'd probably go with a lightly speced FWC or ATC if you want to design to a specific payload.  FWC includes as-built weight in their builds and Hallmark says they provide "true dry weights" but that was B.S. back in 2014.  My camper was several hundred pounds more than what it should have been using their provided weights.  Before putting a deposit down on a Hallmark I'd write up a contract regarding acceptable as-built weight and see if they would sign it.


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#19 thisisepic

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 02:00 PM

I sold our Hallmark K2 to a guy with an aluminum F-150.  His was a 6.5' bed with my 8' K2.  It worked but is pushing it on the payload.  I'd probably go with a lightly speced FWC or ATC if you want to design to a specific payload.  FWC includes as-built weight in their builds and Hallmark says they provide "true dry weights" but that was B.S. back in 2014.  My camper was several hundred pounds more than what it should have been using their provided weights.  Before putting a deposit down on a Hallmark I'd write up a contract regarding acceptable as-built weight and see if they would sign it.

thanks enelson. i got that impression from hallmark, too... so i'm getting a FWC raven shell with a few options (flexible solar, awning, dual battery), which will fit my 5'8" bed perfectly and means i can still tow a couple horses a short distance if necessary. per a recommendation from this post, i'll install airbags and maybe a new sway bar too. i'll live with the camper for a little while and see what else i really need and customize it myself from there, keeping it as light as possible.


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