Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Newbie With Tire Question

Tires Bobcat ATC

  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 bj40

bj40

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • LocationPortland, OR

Posted 10 April 2018 - 02:19 PM

This is my first post and I want to begin by saying that I have been very impressed by the friendly and helpful nature of the members of this forum.

I began "wandering the west" as an Outward Bound instructor back in the late sixties when I turned twenty. Back then it was backpacking in the mountains of Cali, Oregon and WA. Later in my thirties and forties it was river expeditions in the canyons of Utah. I always had to pinch myself to think I was getting paid to do such work.  And along the way I was carpentering  houses in Wyoming and Alaska and even New Zealand and teaching middle school. Been lurking here for the past year.

 

Now I am an outdoor painter, oil on canvass and my expedition vehicle has been a 94 Toyota single cab, 2 wheel drive with a cap and a couple of rocket boxes and a foam pad; ac is attained by rolling down the window. Great MPG. BUT, I am turning 70 in July and feel I'm ready for an upgrade.

 

I have a Bobcat shell on the build schedule at ATC and a 2014 Tacoma 4x4 DCLB(new to me) In the driveway. Yes, I have read about the problems of the Toyota and overweight issues. I plan to do the buildout myself trying to think like a thru hiker on the PCT. Yes, I definiitely want to get off the beaten path but have little to zero experience with 4X4. I imagine that the majority of my driving will be on the highway, then forest service/BLM, to roads that say "4 wheel only".  Will be looking for "dispersed camping" as I have used regular campgrounds less times than fingers on one hand in this whole life. 

 

Any mods to the truck will only come as the need arises. From my reading here, I'll probably go with airbags to start. But even before that I need tires as the ones on the truck are very near the end of their useful life. Currently using 265/70/16. Been tire shopping but am getting lots of different answers. Not interested changing the rims unless it makes good sense. One tire salesman asked me how I wanted the tires to look on the truck, and yea I know that tires and rims can be pretty cool looking but...........

 

If you understand my quandry about this tire purchase and have an experience or reccomendation I would sure be happy to have you share it with me.

 

BTW,

I do own a 1980 Landcruiser BJ40. Hence my handle. It gets shifted into four wheel once per month unless I am pulling a trailer with block or sand or rock up a steep hill. It has been my construction vehicle for the past twelve years. I suppose that if a person can have love for a truck, then I'm guilty with this one. Runs like fine watch with only 150,000 kilometers. "Un regalo en mi vida."

 

Thanks

 


  • 0

#2 Wandering Sagebrush

Wandering Sagebrush

    Free Range Human

  • Site Team
  • 6,366 posts
  • LocationNorthern Oregon

Posted 10 April 2018 - 04:32 PM

Hi BJ40, welcome to WTW!!!

I have a Bobcat on a Ford Ranger. I’m guessing I am around 1200 pounds of camper. My tires are Toyo Open Country AT.
LT 245/75 R 16. They’re 10 ply and in my opinion overkill. A bit rough riding. I’m thinking of going to a 6 ply Cooper AT that are the same size the truck had originally. Yes on airbags.
  • 0

Real Dogs Have Beards - Fear the Beard

Tu Ne Cede Malis


#3 BillTheHiker

BillTheHiker

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 253 posts
  • LocationBoise, ID

Posted 10 April 2018 - 04:42 PM

Strongly recommend load range E tires, not only to handle the added weight of the camper but for additional plies both tread and sidewall to protect against sharp rocks.  I put Cooper AT3 E range on mine. I have 10K miles on them and drove some of the worst roads in Death Valley with no problems. I have the FWC fleet shell without any appliances so lighter than most. I went with upgraded spring kit so now have 5 leafs and very happy with that. I did not like what I read about air bags alone. I recently got the rig weighed and numbers are below.

2016 Fleet shell on 2008 Tacoma V6, Access cab, 4x4 TRD off road with two extra progressive leaf springs and E rated tires. Weight includes myself.

Front axle: 2360 lbs
Rear axle: 2760 lbs
Total: 5120 lbs

GVWR on door sticker: 5350

5350 - 5120 = 230 lbs for all gear, food, water. So I figure I will usually be at or maybe a bit below GVWR for most trips.
However, using GAWR gross axle weight rating I will be well under the maximum.
 front: 2755 lbs
 rear:  3110 lbs
 total =  5865
 
 I previously weighed just the Tacoma at 4330 lbs (including myself), so the camper is 790. I added a counter, sink and two built-in cabinets adding about 30 lbs so subtracting that gives 760 which is very close to the 766 on the manufacturers statement of origin.


  • 0

#4 klahanie

klahanie

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 797 posts
  • LocationSW BC

Posted 10 April 2018 - 06:23 PM

Welcome bj40 !

 

Enjoyed your intro. Sounds like you will already have quite a bit of experience driving or being driven off highway. Getting to a trail head in an old Beatle or Nova counts the same as in a Jeep  ^_^ . The 4x4 tire part is not much different but the further "in" you go, the more important reliability and traction become - while you are there. Of course those are only two attributes that tires might have.

 

Lots of different tire models will be suitable for "the majority of my driving will be on the highway, then forest service/BLM, to roads that say "4 wheel only"." so my suggestion is that you make a short list prioritizing what is important to you. Cost, longevity, noise, wet handling, off road traction, availability, warranty etc. That will make selection a lot easier, imo.

 

I think sticking with original size and rim is prob a good idea. An all terrain tread, maybe a little on the aggressive pattern side, would be a good, general compromise choice.

 

I'll let the Toyota folks recommend some brands ...

 

ON EDIT: I'll add the consideration of travelling solo, remote and without much recovery gear. If applicable that might tip the selection to a more aggressive M/T type pattern - at least in the PNW. Wouldn't add anything to driving on pavement though, unless you like "hummmm".


Edited by klahanie, 10 April 2018 - 06:34 PM.

  • 0

~David.  2010 F350 C&C w camper deck. 1997 Granby, orig owners.


#5 Casa Escarlata Robles Too

Casa Escarlata Robles Too

    Buffalo Boulders

  • Site Team
  • 5,626 posts
  • Locationmonterey bay area

Posted 10 April 2018 - 07:26 PM

Welcome to the WTW group and the ATC Bobcat family.

I have a 2009 Bobcat originally made for the 2006 Ranger I had

but after 2 years I went to a 2002 Tundra mainly for more power as 

the Ranger had the small V6 and was under powered.

The camper did great on that truck until there was some hills or strong head winds.

Now the Bobcat sits on the Tundra and no power problems.

The only mods to the suspension were supersprings on the Ranger and air bags on the Tundra.

I really like the air bags over the supersprings. Air bags give you more options.

Have fun with your rig.

Frank


  • 0
2002 Tundra AC TRD 4WD Limited 2009 ATC Bobcat loaded http://sharychic.blogspot.com/

#6 bj40

bj40

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • LocationPortland, OR

Posted 10 April 2018 - 08:14 PM

Thanks for your replys.

 

Yes, been down a few rough roads in a "bug"; fond memories those are. Liked the VW van as well, but gave up on the slow speeds and a burned valve or two, moved onto a Ford Club wagon, straight 6 manual, for expeditions with the kids. That was another one to love. Then I turned a Ford long body tradesman into a camper for Mexico and Central America. Another great one that ended up as a fried fish business on the beach in Costa Rica. It deserved way better.

 

I think I already get it. Put a camper on a Tacoma and you best go with e rated and accept the highway "hum". Especially, if you want to go to the "back of beyond" solo. Anyone know of a low decible "e" tire for the highway to get you to the place where you need the All Terrain. Could be I'll need two sets, with the camper and without.

 

Bill, Thanks for shareing your weights. I'll do a little more figuring in that regard. With those leaf springs you have added, how is the ride if the camper is not on? Some say that can be a bit bouncy uness you keep a few hundred-weight of bagged sand in the back. Thoughts on that?

Klahanie, off road traction, don't always need it, until you do. Thanks for your thoughts.

WSage, read many posts from you and I definitly pay attention :)


Edited by bj40, 10 April 2018 - 08:15 PM.

  • 0

#7 rando

rando

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1,025 posts
  • LocationColorado

Posted 10 April 2018 - 09:12 PM

I have used 235/85 R16 load range 'E' BFG All Terrains on my current Tacoma w/ FWC Fleet and my prior Tacoma.   They have worked for me and seem to be a good compromise of on road manners and off road performance, and I have NEVER had a flat.  These particular tires have the 'Mountain Snowflake' symbol which means they are rated as a snow tire as well - which is useful in states with traction laws, but they are not nearly as good as true snow tire.   The skinniness of the 85% profile tires helps offset some of the fuel economy loss from heavier tires. 

 

I am sure others will chime in with what has worked for them. 


  • 0

2016 Fleet Flatbed

2016 Toyota Tacoma


#8 BillTheHiker

BillTheHiker

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 253 posts
  • LocationBoise, ID

Posted 10 April 2018 - 10:23 PM

 

Bill, Thanks for shareing your weights. I'll do a little more figuring in that regard. With those leaf springs you have added, how is the ride if the camper is not on? Some say that can be a bit bouncy uness you keep a few hundred-weight of bagged sand in the back. Thoughts on that?

 

Camper is on full time and springs were added during the camper install so I cannot say. But I have read in this  forum reports that the springs cause the Tacoma to ride rather stiff without the camper. Some added air bags for that purpose. I have also experienced "porpoising" on a few occasions while driving on concrete interstates but think that is mainly the short wheelbase. There is a thread on this -search for porpoising.


  • 0

#9 Taku

Taku

    Buffalo Rockface

  • Members
  • 451 posts

Posted 11 April 2018 - 12:27 PM

Welcome. I have an 05 Tundra with Ocelot - that I built out with cabinets, furnace and such. I ran Michelin AT's with no problem for 60K miles on highway, 2WD and 4WD roads throughout the west. Just switched to BFG KO2's for better sidewall protection in mind. A bit noisier (but not objectionable) and maybe a bit less traction on ice ( I drive over Teton Pass in Wyoming on a regular basis). Both sets I would buy again - depends on how rough a road you really plan on traveling. If more on the highway, Michelin's would work fine. Good luck.


  • 0
2005 Tundra  2013 Ocelot    "Ridiculously comfortable"

#10 ntsqd

ntsqd

    Custom User Title

  • Members
  • 2,201 posts
  • LocationNorth So.CA

Posted 11 April 2018 - 12:34 PM

Beware of "sidewall plies rating" vs. actual sidewall plies. A rating is worthless against punctures, you need the actual plies. 3 at minimum.


  • 0
Thom

Where does that road go?





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Tires, Bobcat, ATC

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users