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Camper Ordered, But Which Truck to get?

payload truck choice dependability advice for new truck owners vehicle choice

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#11 camper rich

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 03:35 AM

Welcome to WTW. I too am on my 2nd FWC, the first being a shell model Ranger II on a '98 Dodge Dakota. 'Made 10 trips to Baja in it, but it was always overloaded and in my opinion died an early death at 100k due to tranny problems. Now we own a '08 Dodge Ram 2500 Quad Cab SB and a 2016 Grandby Self Contained. We also pull a small offroad trailer to carry our inflatable boat and motor, a sea kayak, ARB fridge, my wife's solar oven, snorkeling gear, mountain bikes, Honda generator, for our trips to Baja

The advantage of the 3/4 ton truck is it definitely increases your options in the future. If, in a couple of years you decide to move up to a Grandby like ours, or want to carry more gear you have that option. Our truck is gas so we definitly pay a penalty there, but diesels have their drawbacks too.

OTOH, A Tundra will keep you light and simple and you will have an excuse not to buy all those extra toys.
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#12 OutToLunch

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 05:05 PM

My two cents:

First cent, Consumer Reports is not objective. The way in which they collect their data on dependability is not methodologically sound. (Self-reported data, sampling issues, etc.) Take their data with a grain of salt as you should the views you collect here.

Two, dependability of vehicles has improved drastically over the last forty-fifty years. Turning 100k used to be a big deal. This matters a lot depending on how long you plan on keeping and driving your truck. I would be comfortable with most brands up to 150k-200k. If you are only using the truck for camping/travel, that is a lot of trips.

Having said that, last year I put a ATC Ocelot on a 2013 F150. It works, no complaints. However, if I had to do it over I would have bought a 3/4 ton back in 2013. Why? Larger margin of error. Unfortunately, I wasn’t thinking of buying a pop up at the time I bought the truck. I was thinking firewood, manure, and tent camping.

What do we mean by light off-road? This is a question for the larger forum. Does off road refer to any non-pavement driving? I drive forest service roads and other dirt roads every day, even some one lane roads.
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#13 Flyfisher

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 10:46 PM

I understand your conundrum. I have a Hawk on a 06 Tundra since 2010. I am happy with the reliability and the gas mileage. Unfortunately Toyotas seem to be light on the payloads and I may be a little over. My main concern is emergency handling and I don't know if that changes if you get a bigger more expensive, lower gas mileage 250. Good luck with your decision.

Gregg


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#14 Bwht4x4

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 12:01 AM

I understand your conundrum. I have a Hawk on a 06 Tundra since 2010. I am happy with the reliability and the gas mileage. Unfortunately Toyotas seem to be light on the payloads and I may be a little over. My main concern is emergency handling and I don't know if that changes if you get a bigger more expensive, lower gas mileage 250. Good luck with your decision.

Gregg

 

Lower gas mileage may be the case with a gasser 250/2500 truck.  A 250/2500 truck with a diesel will likely get better and possibly much better mileage than a Tundra.  My 2018 Ram empty will get 20-22 mpg on the highway.  Everyone I know that has or had a Tundra doesn't/didn't get near that empty and no where even close loaded.


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2018 Dodge Ram 2500 Quad Cab, 4WD, CTD paired with a 2013 FWC Hawk


#15 So Cal Adventurer

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 12:53 AM

I have a fully loaded 2018 Hawk on a 2014 Tundra..

 

Although many said "It will be fine" it simply isn't enough truck for the weight, especially when offroading as much as i do.

 

I've spent a ton of $ on suspension upgrades (E tires, new springs, bags, etc..) to beef it up, and it does ok, but if i was starting from scratch, i would most DEFINITELY start with a 3/4 ton.

 

Note: I have owned Toyotas only over 20 years and am a die hard Toyota nut/fan!! 

 

However, i am in love with my hawk, and looking at Dodge 2500 options at this point..

 

My .02


Edited by So Cal Adventurer, 07 January 2019 - 12:55 AM.

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My 2014 Tundra 4x4 Build Write Up:

 

http://www.motobased...ndra-build.html


#16 ntsqd

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 12:55 AM

We've twice pulled ~19 mpg out of our '95 CTD w/ camper & 315-75R17 tires in place, but the norm is more like 13-15. There could have been other times where we exceeded our norm, we only spot-check occasionally.

 

Klahanie said, leave yourself some margin at the start. Leave room in the weight capacity for things like should one of you decide to try cooking with Dutch Ovens you'll instantly gain another 100+ lbs of load.


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Thom

Where does that road go?

#17 Beach

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 01:14 AM

Welcome to the site. I carried my Hawk on a 06 Tundra the first two years. It now rides on a 2012 F250 4x4 gasser. I now have better braking, no payload concerns and better handling on and off road. If you decide to go with the tundra and modify the suspension, I highly recommend you completely replace the spring packs instead of adding extra leafs.
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#18 Vic Harder

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 01:25 AM

I sold my Tundra when I bought my Hawk, and love how the 2002 GMC 2500HD (8.1 & Allison)/Hawk combo I have now handles and drives.  No suspension mods needed.

 

To add to your weight calculations, consider solar power panel weight, and the weight of 250AH of batteries.  And as was mentioned above, the weight of recovery gear.    These guys estimate 35+ kilos for a recovery kit! https://www.youtube....?v=ta0xWzwbEeg'


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2006 Silverado 3500 ext cab 8' bed LBZ, FASS, EGT delete, 5" exhaust, FTE Resonator, MotorOps 50 HP Tow Tune

2005 Hawk Shell built the way I like it - SOLD

2012 ATC Puma (Grandby) shell - build started!


#19 So Cal Adventurer

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 01:38 AM

Welcome to the site. I carried my Hawk on a 06 Tundra the first two years. It now rides on a 2012 F250 4x4 gasser. I now have better braking, no payload concerns and better handling on and off road. If you decide to go with the tundra and modify the suspension, I highly recommend you completely replace the spring packs instead of adding extra leafs.

 

Yeah, i have a 2014 Tundra.  I had the Old Man Emu with an add a leaf, and bags.  The springs are to the point, if i deflate the bags, they have a negative arch.  :(

 

I just ordered some custom springs from Boise.  If those dont work, ill be shopping for a Dodge!


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My 2014 Tundra 4x4 Build Write Up:

 

http://www.motobased...ndra-build.html


#20 OregonOzzy

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 03:01 AM

Had a 2012 Tundra (profile pic) Rock Warrior Edition, so it came with better shocks already and 17" E-rated BFG's. I added a Hellwig sway bar in rear and Firestone RideRite airbags. Drove many 1000's of miles with a Hawk (~1600lbs) of payload on FS roads and hwy driving. Tundra sticker was 1470lbs and I never really felt comfortable. I never quite liked the way it cornered and even though I never had to do any high speed evasive maneuvers, I never quite felt comfortable. The braking was great ( I think the Tundra has one of the best brakes for 1/2T). Reliability was great in the 3 years of my ownership and had no problems with it. The truck without the camper handled very well, almost drove like a nice SUV and the interior was very nice (TRD package). Mid-2018 I traded that in for a 2016 Ram2500 Tradesman (gas, payload 2360lbs). Put the camper on and with no mods at all (only E-Rated tires), bone stock truck went off a 3000+mile trip of hwy and FS roads. Did not even feel if the truck was carrying the same Hawk in the back. It handles and brakes so much better than the Tundra. Plus now I can carry the kitchen sink too! Granted the interior is not the same as a Toyota (I am sure you can get better options) and the acceleration is like a real 3/4 ton truck (Tundra you could put into sports mode transmission), but this is a real truck for hauling the heavy payload it is intended to. Having driven both 1/2T Tundra and 3/4T Dodge, I will not go back to the 1/2T for the job it needs to do safely. My .02.    


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2002 Hawk on a 2012 Toyota Tundra Rock Warrior

Firestone airbags and Hellwig Rear Sway Bar

2002 Hawk on a 2016 Ram2500 Tradesman

Stock truck w/E-Rated BFG TA KO2's






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