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Cameras, Lenses and Photography Gear


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#1 Wandering Sagebrush

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 09:05 PM

Please use this thread to discuss cameras, lenses and related gear such as support (tripods) and other related items.   Remember, please no Brand Bashing.


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#2 100acrehuphalump

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 12:00 AM

I recently purchased a GoProSilver Hero 3. Sounds like a crazy vehicle. It's still new in the box, as I haven't had much of a chance to play with it yet. I'm looking forward to my up and coming two month road trip across the country to learn how to use it while driving, biking, kayaking and fishing. I'm in the market for an entry level professional camera so I can take other photographs too. So thanks for starting this thread.
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#3 Bigfoot

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 01:43 AM

I recently purchased a GoProSilver Hero 3. Sounds like a crazy vehicle. It's still new in the box, as I haven't had much of a chance to play with it yet. I'm looking forward to my up and coming two month road trip across the country to learn how to use it while driving, biking, kayaking and fishing. I'm in the market for an entry level professional camera so I can take other photographs too. So thanks for starting this thread.

 

I have a GoPro, too. Fun little device. It takes pretty good stills as well as video and is, of course, great for crazy locations such as your truck bumper, deck of a kayak or under a drone. The 3 problems I have had are the tiny screen, short battery life, and the run-and-gun nature of the images. I use a smartphone app to control it (which requires battery draining WiFi) and a dual battery pack but it is still limited to under an hour of use. That's probably for the best because the massive number of images it can store require too much editing time. Consequently, I generally use it for special purposes. My main cameras are all mirrorless models from Olympus, Panasonic and Sony. 


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#4 PaulT

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 05:49 AM

If you're hand holding Hero videos, a Steadicam Curve will smooth it out. Not perfect in my hands but better than without it.

http://www.tiffen.com/steadicamcurve/

Some have made their own. Search for "homemade steadicam"

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#5 ETAV8R

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 06:44 AM

My gear:

5D w/ 24-70L, 70-200L

G15 w/ magfilter and polarizing lens

GoPro Hero 4 Black

Cell-phone

 

Trying to save up for a 6D


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#6 Happyjax

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 12:27 PM

I have a Nikon setup and have been pleased with their equipment. Canon is just as good. They both have strong points and issues. I also have an Olympus micro four thirds mirrorless. It takes great stills, landscapes, people portraits but kinda sucks at sports shots and moving birds. The menu system is also convoluted. If you like the micro four thirds size check out the panasonic also. They are very portable. I haven't played with any of the go pros yet but will eventually. Right now I use the cell phone for quickie videos:) The Nikon/Canon systems also shoot video as do the micro 4/3 and they are all good :)


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#7 Wandering Sagebrush

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 12:10 AM

It's coming up on hot weather season soon, and in many parts of the west it's already here. Just a reminder to take care of your gear in the heat. Black cameras in extreme heat don't fare well.

Let's start with batteries. Hot weather will zap the power out of your batteries, as will cold weather. Have extras, or be able to charge.

Keep your cameras out of the sun. A white tee shirt or pillow case makes a good cover for a camera on a tripod, or when you set it down.

Black camera bags are solar ovens to the gear inside. Keep it out of the sun.

If you're in sandy, dusty or windy conditions, don't change lenses in an open environment. It's better to carry two cameras with lenses that cover your needed focal length. BTW, in really bad conditions, a zoom lens rapidly sucks up enough sand to make it a fantastic albeit expensive paper weight. Don't forget to extend the lower legs on your tripod when you're in sand, otherwise you can get sand into the leg locks.

In the field, carry some cleaning tools. A small paint brush or bristle shaving brush do a good job of knocking the big stuff off the bodies and lenses. I also have fine bristle cosmetic brush that does a good job on getting stuff off a lens element or filter. A rocket blower is another tool that gets the fine stuff that is easy to dislodge. A microfiber cloth and lens cleaning solution is fine, once you get the grit off. Save cleaning the sensor for when you get into a protected environment.
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#8 ski3pin

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Posted 15 May 2015 - 12:15 AM

Mr. Sage, thanks for the tips, except, maybe, that one about needing more camera bodies. :o


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#9 Bombsight

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 11:46 AM

Anyone using GND filters? "Lee Big Stopper" in particular?

 

 

7269933088_dafbb30bbe_c.jpgIMG_1483 by Bombsight Photography, on Flickr


Edited by Bombsight, 21 May 2015 - 11:47 AM.

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#10 Wandering Sagebrush

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 01:31 PM

Nice Lee kit! I use GNDs, and have the Big Stopper, but haven't put it to use yet. For anyone saying "What in blue blazes is a Big Stopper?", It's a 10 stop neutral density filter. Used for shots like smoothing out white water, surf and waving grass.

For graduated neutral density filters, I like the three stop, hard filters. In particular the Singh Ray reverse filter that has the darkest area at the graduation point. So good for sunrise/sunset shots.

I see you use the 4x6 size. Great for hand holding.

If you don't have the Lee filter wallet, it's a great way to keep them organized.
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