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#1 Leviticus907

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 04:41 AM

Does anybody have experience with an insulated floor compared to a non insulated floor? I would like to be as prepped as possible for winter camping.

I'm thinking the greatest points of intrusion for the cold are the cabover folding sections and where the upper and lower camper connect.

It would be easy enough to build a false insulated floor for the camper but I wonder if it would actually help?
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#2 kimosawboy

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 03:35 PM

I did see that you can get the option of an insulated floor from the company. Since my camper is on a flatdeck it will be pretty easy for me to insulate from the bottom up. For the cost of some rigid insulation and a little bit of work I think it will be more than worth it. This past trip we used some reflective thermal break insulation under our foam and felt a big difference in temp. more so in the ''truck-bedside''areas.


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#3 RicoV

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 12:09 AM

Even something as simple as interlocking 1/4" EVA foam tiles over our Grandby's floor has made a huge difference in comfort for us on cool winter nights, and didn't break the bank in the slightest.  I encourage you to go forth and insulate wherever you perceive there may be value in it.

Rico. 


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#4 PackRat

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 01:18 AM

Rico's solution sounds pretty good. They are cheap enough that after they wear out in a season or two, you can toss them (or use them on your shop floor) and buy new ones.....I have used a very cheap industrial, low pile carpet in my Alaskans but I'm not a winter camper so I think that insulating tiles sound worth trying. Just remember to check the height of the ones you choose against the door bottoms in the camper so you can be sure the doors will still open/close easily. I thing 1/4" to 5/16" might be OK but check to see if a 3/8" tile will fit or not. 

 

I suppose you could just buy one or two and try them all around the floor to be sure they fit. 

 

You should also insulate the areas of the floor in the closet, under the seats and under the sink with the exception of messing with the pump and the tubing for it, the tubing for water in/out of the camper if possible.


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#5 klahanie

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 01:23 AM

Does anybody have experience with an insulated floor compared to a non insulated floor? ?

 

Not built in. But like the others have added material under the foam mattress and a fatigue runner on top of the aisle floor. Results are, warmer in bed with less condensation under the mattress and a noticeable difference in comfort underfoot. Also sometimes use reflexit around the berth walls. That seems to help with cold spots also.


Edited by klahanie, 06 November 2019 - 01:25 AM.

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#6 fish more

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Posted 06 November 2019 - 02:55 PM

I use carpet with rubber backing on the floor, seems to help keep camper floor warmer on those cold days. The carpet I used was a industrial door mat with a nice design cut to fit.


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#7 Leviticus907

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 01:58 PM

Not built in. But like the others have added material under the foam mattress and a fatigue runner on top of the aisle floor. Results are, warmer in bed with less condensation under the mattress and a noticeable difference in comfort underfoot. Also sometimes use reflexit around the berth walls. That seems to help with cold spots also.

Yeah I was thinking as many spots as possible in the lower camper, behind the cupboards if possible and definitely below the seats which should be easy access.
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#8 Leviticus907

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 02:00 PM

I use carpet with rubber backing on the floor, seems to help keep camper floor warmer on those cold days. The carpet I used was a industrial door mat with a nice design cut to fit.

Yeah stepping on carpet sounds much warmer and would help soak up some snow melt.
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#9 Keith in Co

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Posted 16 December 2019 - 09:20 PM

On my early 1960’s NCO Alaskan, I’ve added 1.5” rigid foam insulation under the floor, which adds R-5.78.  For perspective, 3/4” plywood is R-.94.  Used pressure treated 2x2” (“2x4” ripped to make 1.5” ) screwed across every 20” or so to support the camper weight and keep the insulation from crushing. After painting the 2x2s and floor exterior with gray Behr deck paint, I screwed and glued the insulation using fender washers to help distribute the tension of the screw heads.

To get a proper fit, I end up shimming between the top of the pickup bed side and the camper anyway, so the extra height is a nonissue.

it is regrettable that Alaskan did not insulate the lower half of these campers, but insulating the floor helps, especially as the floor is the coldest area of the camper.

Used the same insulation below and in front of the water tank too.

Made window plugs for the side windows using 1/2” rigid foam insulation with aluminum foil tape to finish off the edges. They store behind the seat cushions when not in use.

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Edited by Keith in Co, 23 December 2019 - 08:59 PM.

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#10 Leviticus907

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Posted 18 December 2019 - 11:36 PM

I would have to agree with you I wish there was some sort of insulation in the lower half. I asked Alaskan camper and they said it's just the way they've been doing it since the 50s. I think it's time for a change! I also think they dont insulate the lower half because there is so much less space than the upper half. And the dead space from all the cabinets and seats acts as an air "insulator"

So did you essentially build an insulated platform that sits in the truck bed then camper goes on top?
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2004 Silverado Ext. Cab 4x4 6.0 2500hd
2016 Alaskan Camper i.e. best decision I've ever made ;)




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