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Winter / cold weather optimized Hawk Shell

shell hawk winter ski skiing tundra

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#11 LetsGo

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 07:57 PM

Great, thanks for the info. I am new to popup campers and campers in general. Still trying to figure out how to build the interior of my camper and the backseat of the truck. 


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#12 Wallowa

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 08:52 PM

I've only been worried about snow loading on the roof a couple times ... back when I had the old Jayco camper. That roof was already super heavy with old ass hardware holding it up ... not snow but super windy nights were the sketchiest.

 

When I do need to mess with snow on top I drop the camper at one end and use a windshield scraper with an extendable, soft "snow broom" and I push / pull the snow off ... then swap and do the other end. Can't get 100% of the snow but can get more than enough to lighten the load. I tried a squeegee on a telescoping pole but it wasn't better than a push broom or brush.

 

I haven't yet felt the need get up at night to mess with snow, but I guess it would really depend on what the snow is like. A super heavy dump of Sierra / Cascade Cement (like you might see over there on the coast) might get me worried but that would be abnormal for Eastern Oregon / Idaho / Utah where I usually ski. I wish I was involved with more snow dumps that would cause concern but no such luck as of yet.

 

An issue I've found to be challenging is after days of camping with melt / freeze conditions (either from heater or sun) and an ice layer builds up ... that can be pretty heavy and you can't really scrape it w/o risk of damage ... so you just roll with it. I've had zero issue with snow buildup on the sides, so that has been great. I've had to chip ice out of the clip clamps to secure the top for travel ... a few minutes with a screwdriver took care of that. 

 

As for lowering with snow, I have lowered it with a good amount of snow on top and it came down really fast. The next time I had a similar situation I left the door closed and only opened a single turnbuckle door ... that helped keep the inside pressurized to support the weight on top and the roof came down slower.

 

If the snow was crazy deep, in a pinch we could drop the top and sleep on the "bench" ... but have never had the need to do so thus far. Fingers crossed for that!

 

I ordered the back steps on the wall to help me stand up higher in anticipation of clearing snow ... they help a little but not much as there is nothing to hold on to up there with no rack. I've found them more useful to hang wet gear to dry in the sun than to help scrape snow.

 

Unless the dump is a Powderchaser Steve "Snorkel Alert" I wouldn't worry about it.

 

 

By accident I just discovered the easy way for me to reach the roof to clear the snow...I had climbing loops to use in my FWC back wall steps but found that I can open Hawk door and stand inside I easily reach the roof to remove the snow if needed....much easier if top is down but with the top up and standing on the Rubbermaid steps inside the camper with door open I can also reach the roof..I am 5'10" so not a tall person...


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#13 Wandering Sagebrush

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 10:38 PM

Holy catfish, Phil!  That sounds like a good way to get hurt.  At our age, I’m going to pass.  My stunt with the chainsaw and ladder last year has me thinking twice about anything risky.  Be safe!


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#14 Wallowa

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Posted 01 February 2020 - 11:29 PM

Holy catfish, Phil!  That sounds like a good way to get hurt.  At our age, I’m going to pass.  My stunt with the chainsaw and ladder last year has me thinking twice about anything risky.  Be safe!

 

 

Ha!  I hear your "at our age"...but standing in doorway you still have firm footing and a great hand hold or two..yes, I am living proof that sometimes the adage "there is no fool like an old fool" is appropriate...I did the "chainsaw over your head" once; more than enough..

 

But experiment with standing in doorway and facing the roof...really a solid stance..."hey, am I on belay or not?" B)


Edited by Wallowa, 01 February 2020 - 11:30 PM.

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