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#21 Smokecreek1

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Posted 04 April 2020 - 04:18 PM

Well, since winter seems to have returned to the High Desert, time to break out that stable and my go too meal-red beans and ham hocks. All you do is put a good pot on the stove (or camp stove, fire etc), turn it on low, put in some ham hocks (shanks, cut up ham  or what ever you have handy), salt pork and some cut up bacon, some tomatoes and tomato sauce, onions, garlic, paprika and pepper , a slug of wine, put the cover on; add your beans (red, white, black-what ever) after a few more hours   and simmer it until the pork starts to fall off of the bones .  Best thing about this is you get to smell it all day (or days) as it cooks! Break out some good french bread and butter and a bottle of vinegar to splash on the ham and beans and add some potato salad or rice (maybe both) and make a quick check for any small bones.if hamhocks, then eat.   It only gets better with age and will get you thru those power outages!

 

Smoke


Edited by Smokecreek1, 04 April 2020 - 05:38 PM.

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#22 BillTheHiker

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Posted 13 April 2020 - 09:56 PM

Just curious if others are having same difficulty finding flour in grocery stores. Read there is widespread shortages, likely due to hoarding. If there is a source online I would like to hear about it. I can find it online at all the major grocers in Boise, but when I go top pick it up they are sold out. Was told they get shipments occasionally but they fly off the shelves in a couple hours.


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#23 ski3pin

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Posted 13 April 2020 - 10:28 PM

Just curious if others are having same difficulty finding flour in grocery stores. Read there is widespread shortages, likely due to hoarding. If there is a source online I would like to hear about it. I can find it online at all the major grocers in Boise, but when I go top pick it up they are sold out. Was told they get shipments occasionally but they fly off the shelves in a couple hours.

No flour, bread flour, or yeast. Finally found bread flour yesterday. We bought one five pound bag. We had two bags. "One per customer," the clerk sternly said. "But there's two of us," the Lady replied. We got "the look" and I asked if I should return it. "No," she said. "I'll just add it to the pile I have here behind me."

 

We ordered a pound of yeast on amazon. We'll split it with friends. It arrives Wednesday. Homemade cinnamon rolls Wednesday night!

 

 


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#24 ski3pin

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Posted 13 April 2020 - 10:30 PM

This was darn good this weekend. :)

 

 

 

Baked Porridge

(Serves 6-8)

 

Preheat oven to 350

 

In large bowl, mix the following and blend well:

 

3 cups Oatmeal (we use Coach’s Oats)

1 cup brown sugar

½ Teaspoon salt

2 Teaspoons baking powder

 

In separate bowl, mix well:

2 eggs

 

Add all ingredients together, including:

 

½ cup melted butter

1 cup milk

1 Teaspoon vanilla

 

OPTIONAL- ¼ Teaspoon cinnamon

 

Place the mixture in an 8x8 baking dish-some cooking spray or butter may prevent the porridge from sticking

 

Bake for 30-35 minutes at 350

 

Serve with fruit, yogurt, or milk.  It is crumbly when warm but firms as it cools.

For extra crunch, leave in oven for extra 10 minutes

 

 

 


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#25 PaulT

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Posted 13 April 2020 - 11:31 PM

Look up JIT (Just In Time) inventory management. Over the last few decades, most of inventory for stores and manufacturing has adopted this practice. To minimize inventory costs, shipments are scheduled to arrive "just in time" for the need. Unfortunately, JIT doesn't react well to a step function change in demand such as the current situation has created. The tractor trailers on the road have become the warehouses. Supermarkets keep sufficient inventory for just two to three days of demand.

 

This works with predictable usage at both retail and manufacturing but make a big change in demand such as a large drop in TP usage at work with an increase at home, and it takes a while for things to adapt. TP rolls for commercial restrooms do not always fit home dispensers.

 

Can't eat out in a restaurant and and have more time at home and, perhaps, you bake some bread at home, I'll bet 100 lb bags of flour are more readily available as demand for 5lb and 10lb bags increases.  People probably eating more sandwiches at home than burgers and fries for lunch. Doesn't take much of a change to empty the shelves of some items. Standing orders won't refill the shelves.

 

Reread the "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", carry your towel, and above all, "Don't Panic!"  :P

 

Paul


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#26 Wandering Sagebrush

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Posted 18 April 2020 - 09:40 PM

I baked another French Apple Cake this afternoon, but added a bit of

cinnamon and cardamom to the batter,  as well as a few chopped dates.  That’s dessert tonight.

Attached File  2FEA64DE-3BB1-4AC6-80FD-C65D14C1E63F.jpeg   252.36K   2 downloads


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#27 Casa Escarlata Robles Too

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Posted 18 April 2020 - 10:04 PM

Yummy. How about e-mailing me a slice?

Frank


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#28 Wandering Sagebrush

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Posted 18 April 2020 - 10:10 PM

Yummy. How about e-mailing me a slice?

Frank

Frank, I will give it a try, but suspect just the aroma will make it.


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#29 iowahiker

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Posted 19 April 2020 - 09:12 PM

Whole Grain Rye Bread:

 

Mix the following dry ingredients in a large bowl: 

 

1/2 cup white bread flour

3 tsp gluten powder (optional)

1 tsp salt (2 if you are not trying to be low salt)

1 cup organic dark rye flour, Bob's Red Mill is our brand

1 or 2 packages of yeast (depends on how active your yeast is)

 

Mix wet ingredients in a pot:

 

1/4 cooking oil, canola or olive are good choices

2 tbs dark molasses (very very dark is our favorite)

2 1/2 cups skim milk or 1 1/2 cups skim milk + 1 cup water (even 100% water would work)

1/2 cup unflavored greek yogurt or 2 tbs vinegar 

 

Heat wet ingredients to 100-105 deg F, use a thermometer 

 

Pour warm wet ingredients into bowl of mixed dry ingredients and mix well.

 

Mix in additional dark rye flour 1/2 cup at a time to make a THICK batter.

 

Let thick batter rise 50% by volume in a warm place covered with a towel.

 

Stir in rye flour in 1/2 cup steps until a stirring/mixing becomes impossible.  Then knead in more rye flour in 1/4 cup steps to form a smooth uniform ball.  I knead in the bowl to avoid making a mess of my kitchen.

 

Coat dough ball with cooking oil and let rise in the bowl in a warm place 50% by volume covered with a towel.

 

Grease two 4x4x8 standard bread loaf pans.

 

Divide the dough ball in to two pieces.  Knead each piece into an egg shaped ball as long as the loaf pans.  Dust each piece with white flour and place in each bread loaf pan.

 

Let rise in a warm place 50% by volume covered with a towel.

 

Preheat oven to 380 deg F.

 

Cook 30-32 minutes depending on your oven performance.

 

Roll out loaves on to cooling racks.  Cool completely.  Slice and serve with cream cheese or fresh butter.  We routinely eat slices plain and untoasted.  Toasting gives a slightly different taste.

 

A very "earthy" true rye taste.   The first and only "whole grain" bread I have enjoyed.


Edited by iowahiker, 20 April 2020 - 12:14 AM.

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#30 ski3pin

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Posted 27 April 2020 - 10:14 PM

We will try the rye bread! Thanks for the recipe.


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