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#1 michelle_east_county

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 05:55 PM

Power cords used to all be hard-wired into an RV and then coiled back up into whatever housing was created by the RV manufacturer for them. I'm used to these 30-amp cords on the travel trailers my parents had in the '60s and '70s, and Dad's '97 Roadtrek. Since then, I'm seeing expensive boating-industry "shore cords" that plug into a male plug on side of RV and require a lock to prevent theft. Many seem to require an angled adapter (more stuff to buy and pack) on each end so the cord doesn't otherwise stick straight out, blocking passage on the RV end and sometimes not fitting an RV park hookup cover on that end. What's the advantage? What am I missing, here?
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#2 Wandering Sagebrush

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 07:33 PM

Power cords used to all be hard-wired into an RV and then coiled back up into whatever housing was created by the RV manufacturer for them. I'm used to these 30-amp cords on the travel trailers my parents had in the '60s and '70s, and Dad's '97 Roadtrek. Since then, I'm seeing expensive boating-industry "shore cords" that plug into a male plug on side of RV and require a lock to prevent theft. Many seem to require an angled adapter (more stuff to buy and pack) on each end so the cord doesn't otherwise stick straight out, blocking passage on the RV end and sometimes not fitting an RV park hookup cover on that end. What's the advantage? What am I missing, here?

In my opinion, the main advantage is you’re working with light flexible easy to handle and stow power cords (extension cords) instead the stiff heavy 30 amp cords that typical RVs use.


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#3 rando

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Posted 30 April 2021 - 12:30 AM

In my 5 years with a FWC, I have used the shore power cord while camping precisely once.  I have used it in my driveway a hand full of times.    Maybe I am projecting here, but most of the WtW folks don't seem to be full hook up campground type folks either, so maybe there just isn't a demand for hardwired cords in four wheel campers. 


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#4 billharr

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Posted 30 April 2021 - 02:28 AM

In my 5 years with a FWC, I have used the shore power cord while camping precisely once.  I have used it in my driveway a hand full of times.    Maybe I am projecting here, but most of the WtW folks don't seem to be full hook up campground type folks either, so maybe there just isn't a demand for hardwired cords in four wheel campers. 

This..^.   My old 2001 Hawk had a 20 amp 110v male u-ground. My 2013 had a 30 amp 110v male twist lock. Had to buy an adapter to use the extension cord at home. Just never used elec away from the house.   I now have a Class B van and it needs 30 amps. I installed at 30 amp 110v RV plug. I have read several horror stories where RV owners have plugged in to a 220v dryer plug (looks the same as a 110V RV plug). 


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#5 ntsqd

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 01:18 PM

I plug-in at home for the battery maintainer. Due to a very, very large CA Oak there is no place that I can park where it would be unshaded all day long.

 

I would welcome the ability to just plug the extension cord directly into the camper instead of the hard wired heavy cord. I may just add that option in the form of something like this:

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#6 craig333

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 03:25 PM

I think its been three years since I've plugged in. 


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#7 2Z Bundok

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 11:14 PM

Great topic.  Answer; the plugs are angled so that they can be plugged into a socket that is covered with weather protection.  We now have giant clear "warts" on the side of our houses.  Why not on your camper too?  This code is for safety from NEC and NEMA.  

 

My personal code for safety, as a "practical engineer" Lets be aware of what can hurt us and use it smartly!

 

Like others,  Boondocking is our way (away from campgrounds) and the large/heavy cord is not really needed.  Though the power converter is for 30 amp it only has 12V converter and one 20A circuit wired in use.  I have never plugged into a 30 amp socket and always use the adapter.  

We are cutting the cord and installing a short cord and standard male plug ( 15 amp 120V) to the power center.  This will be used with extension cord before departure to load, pre-cool 3 way fridge, then stowed until return.

 

Find what you have, project what you need (the smart part) and use your mod without injury (the safe part).


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