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Ford Transit Suspension


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#1 searching for nowhere

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Posted 28 June 2022 - 04:42 PM

I’ve decided to get a camper van and not pull a trailer anymore.  One key decision I need to make is whether I use a Mercedes Benz Sprinter or a Ford Transit.  I’m leaning towards getting a Ford Transit.  My question is about suspension modification.  It seems well established, what one can do to upgrade the MB suspension and why.  But I’ve found very little information about the benefit/need of modifying the Transit suspension on the web.  I’m guessing this is because most camper vans use the MB.  The couple of web sites I found about the Transit suspension both indicated that if one is using the van somewhat close to the max GVWR, one should change the suspension.  But I have not found an agreed upon approach.  I’m starting to wonder if the Transit suspension is the reason it is not used much for a camper van.  Does anyone have experience with the Ford Transit van suspension? And can you share your experience?  Thanks for any help with my decision.

 

 


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#2 lqhikers

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Posted 28 June 2022 - 11:46 PM

Had a 2016 ford transit med roof van and converted it to camper layout

no problem with stock suspension.

If you go to "ford transit usa forum" you can find out every thing you

have questions about .

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#3 searching for nowhere

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Posted 29 June 2022 - 04:20 PM

Thanks for the reply.  It is nice to hear that you are using the stock suspension.  I've been to the ford transit usa forum and that is where I got confused and concerned about the stock suspension.  Lots of different opinions.  Plus, I read that one guy located in a windy part of the country, had "white knuckle" driving in the wind.  My research continues.  


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#4 lqhikers

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Posted 29 June 2022 - 04:41 PM

We live near Palm Springs ca. and every time we head north we

have to go through a very, very windy pass (I-10) never was a problem

in the transit.

Les,lqhikers


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#5 billharr

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Posted 30 June 2022 - 07:13 PM

I have a 2020 350HD Transit. Stock suspension is good for the road, mine does have have the sway control for high winds. If you want to lift it for more clearance, easy if you have the RWD. If you have the AWD like I do you are limited to about 2 inches at this time. Van Compass looks to be the main kit at this time.


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#6 WanderingBison

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Posted 30 June 2022 - 10:28 PM

I have a 2017 medium roof transit and did upgrade the suspension - VanCompass lift front and back, Bilstein shocks upfront, Fox in the rear with custom leaf springs.

It was a significant investment but made a world of difference in vehicle handling and Forest road behaviour. It will never be a rock crawler but I would do it again since we spent most of our time in national forest, BLM land, etc, including Baja.

Do you NEED it - no! It is a worthwhile investment - yes, if you intend to take your van where you’d normally take a truck camper, etc.
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#7 searching for nowhere

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Posted 30 June 2022 - 11:41 PM

Thanks for the info on experience.  I don’t plan on rock crawling, just driving to windy places and driving washboard and potholed roads.  Seems like I’ll go with the Transit AWD with a 2” lift and drive it for a while to see if I want to do anything more.

 

FYI  Quigley has a Ford certified 2” lift for AWD vans that can be installed by their authorized installers.  Also, Quigley is currently not doing 4x4 conversions on newer vans.  They estimate that they will start offering conversion in a year.  In 2020 Ford changed their design which has required Quigley to complete a new design and new certification.  


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#8 WanderingBison

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Posted 30 June 2022 - 11:47 PM

Thanks for the info on experience. I don’t plan on rock crawling, just driving to windy places and driving washboard and potholed roads. Seems like I’ll go with the Transit AWD with a 2” lift and drive it for a while to see if I want to do anything more.


FYI Quigley has a Ford certified 2” lift for AWD vans that can be installed by their authorized installers. Also, Quigley is currently not doing 4x4 conversions on newer vans. They estimate that they will start offering conversion in a year. In 2020 Ford changed their design which has required Quigley to complete a new design and new certification.


That sounds like a great way forward. An AWD model wasn’t available but I would do that now if I was starting a new build on the Transit.

That modest lift and AWD with the low gearing is really all you need I suspect.

The biggest improvements came from the shock upgrades.

I should also mention that I got the rear shock relocation bracket to tuck them in a bit since they hung quite low.

I’m not sure if they have made any changes there but I would consider that upgrade if I were you. Not expensive but helps with clearance in dirt roads, ruts, etc.
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