Fire Restrictions Begin

ski3pin

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Fire Restrictions and Responsible Recreation on the Eldorado National Forest


PLACERVILLE, CA: With the temperatures soaring, vegetation drying out, and the arrival of the popular 4th of July holiday, the Eldorado National Forest is encouraging responsible recreation by our visiting public. Please remember that Fireworks – even the “safe and sane” variety – are not permitted at any time or in any location within the Forest.

In response to the increasing potential for wildland fire starts, Eldorado National Forest officials are announcing that fire restrictions will be implemented throughout the Forest effective July 3. These restrictions will affect the use of campfires, stoves, smoking materials, and internal combustion engines, and will remain in effect until November 30, 2024.

“As fuel conditions continue to dry through the Eldorado National Forest we will be entering fire restrictions. Human caused fire continues to be the leading cause of destructive wildfires.” said Deputy Fire Chief Lani Brown. “As forest visitors head into their favorite camping and recreation spots it’s important to understand and follow these fire restrictions to reduce the opportunities for a dangerous fire start.”

Effective July 3, per Forest Order 03-24-09 the following restrictions will be in effect:

No open fires, campfires or charcoal fires will be permitted outside of designated Developed Recreation Sites listed in Exhibit A, even with a valid California Campfire Permit. Lanterns and portable stoves using gas, jellied petroleum or pressurized liquid fuel will be permitted, but only with a valid California Campfire Permit, which can be obtained free-of-charge at www.readyforwildfire.org/permits. Forest visitors must clear all flammable material for five feet in all directions from their camp stove, have a shovel available, and ensure that a responsible person always attends the stove during use.

Smoking is prohibited, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or a designated Developed Recreation Site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable material.

Welding or operating an acetylene or other torch with open flame.

Internal combustion engines must have an approved spark arrestor that is correctly installed, maintained, and operating properly.

The fire restrictions forest order with the list of exempted recreation sites (Exhibit A) can be found on the forest website at www.fs.usda.gov/eldorado under the regulations section.


For the latest updates and more information, contact our Visitor Services team at:

Forest Supervisors Office – 530-622-5061
Georgetown Ranger District – 530-333-4312
Pacific / Placerville Ranger District – 530-644-2324
Amador Ranger District – 209-259-3774


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This last week in Placer County, the National Forest Camp Grounds still had no fire restrictions !!! And the camp host were still selling fire wood !!!
 
Jim, Tahoe National Forest Fire Restrictions went into effect July 1, 2024. These restrictions allow fire inside established campgrounds, no where else. Stage 2 restrictions (not yet in effect) will prohibit fires inside campgrounds.

FOREST ORDER No. 17-24-10
USDA FOREST SERVICE
PACIFIC SOUTHWEST REGION
Tahoe National Forest

Fire Restrictions
Pursuant to 16 U.S.C. § 551 and 36 C.F.R. § 261.50(a) and (b), and to protect natural resources
and provide for public safety, the following acts are prohibited within the Tahoe National Forest.
This Order is effective from July 1, 2024, at 5:00 PM PST through November 1, 2024.
1. Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire, or stove fire, except within
a Developed Recreation Site listed in Exhibit A. 36 C.F.R. § 261.52(a).

2. Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, within a Developed
Recreation Site listed in Exhibit A, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in
diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable material. 36 C.F.R. § 261.52(d).
3. Operating an internal combustion engine off paved, gravel or dirt National Forest
System roads and trails, except within the Prosser Pits Developed Off-Highway Vehicle
Area and boats on a water surface. 36 C.F.R. § 261.52(h).
Pursuant to 36 C.F.R. § 261.50(e), the following persons are exempt from this Order:
1. Any Federal, State, or local officer, or member of an organized rescue or fire-fighting
force in the performance of an official duty.
2. Persons with a valid California Campfire Permit are not exempt from the prohibitions
listed above. However, persons with a valid California Campfire Permit may use a
portable campfire ring/pit, stove, or lantern in an area at least three feet from any
flammable materials provided that the portable campfire ring/pit, stove, or lantern
only burns gas, kerosene, jellied petroleum, or pressurized liquid fuel and has a with a
shut-off valve.
3. Persons engaged in Forest Products Removal (fuelwood) are not exempt from the
prohibitions listed above but may operate an internal combustion engine off National
Forest System roads and trails only to the extent necessary to cut fuelwood, provided
the cutting of fuelwood is done in compliance with daily Fire danger project activity
levels.
4. Persons with Forest Service Permit No. FS-7700-48 (Permit for Use of Roads, Trails, or
Areas Restricted by Regulation or Order), specifically exempting them from this Order.

These prohibitions are in addition to the general prohibitions contained in 36 C.F.R. Part 261,
Subpart A.
A violation of these prohibitions is punishable by a fine of not more than $5,000 for an
individual or $10,000 for an organization, or imprisonment for not more than 6 months, or both.

16 U.S.C. § 551 and 18 U.S.C. §§ 3559, 3571, and 3581.
Executed in Nevada City, California, this 1st day of July 2024 at 12:00 PM PST.
______________________________
Matthew Jedra
Acting Forest Supervisor
Tahoe National Forest
Pacific Southwest Region
 
Humboldt-Toiyabe went to stage on July 1 as well. The verbiage is the same as what Ski posted but in the words of Simon and Garfunkle - a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest. I've had words with people who believed if there was rock fire ring it was a "developed site". Or the people who had one of those portable fire rings and (claimed to have) a permit. I asked them where their shovel was. I am not sure if there is much that pisses me off as much as feigned ignorance.
 
We had a USFS Forest Protection Officer (FPO) here, Ken, that I really liked (and miss terribly now). I enjoyed hearing his stories of coming upon illegal campfires. His MO was to a not say a word, pull hose, and drench everything. When he went to work, the fire was out, guaranteed. Then he would have a discussion with the offenders. Their responses and politeness would determine how many of the group would be cited. The Forest Order reads -
Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire, or stove fire
Everyone around the illegal campfire can be cited.

A violation of these prohibitions is punishable by a fine of not more than $5,000 for an
individual or $10,000 for an organization, or imprisonment for not more than 6 months, or both.


As I said, I loved running into Ken and hearing his latest stories. He enjoyed his work.
 
"Everyone around the illegal campfire can be cited"

I was dispersed camping with a group. I was the one with the permit and fire restrictions were in effect. Someone insisted on building a fire. I packed up, wished them good luck and left.
 
Here in Whatcom County, WA, we are at stage 1 effective July 1. Most of the county is part of the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.
 
My gal just told me she read that there is a fire near Truckee started by a campfire. Why do you need a fire when it is hot there?
 
My gal just told me she read that there is a fire near Truckee started by a campfire. Why do you need a fire when it is hot there?
A couple of years ago I was coming out from a backpacking trip on the 4th of July. There is private property right up to the trailhead and there was a group of trailers and a half dozen or so kids running around a bonfire - not a "camp"fire - flame lengths were 10 - 15 feet, fire was maybe 10 feet in diameter and the kids were barefoot. It was the middle of the afternoon.
 

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