What are the wind speed limitations for Mounting and de-mounting an FWC

Bradders

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Feb 22, 2023
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Southampton, UK
Hi folks, we are currently touring Scotland in the UK with our Wildcat FWC - the equivalent in the US is a Fleet I think. Anyway. it’s really windy up here, about 40mph or so and I have the camper de-mounted at the moment as we plan to use the vehicle to go off and see some sights. However, I’m now a bit worried about putting it back on the truck in the wind in case something bends when the jacks are at full extension and the camper is high up. Anyone got any ideas, concerns or been in a similar situation? Or does anyone know what the guidance is?
 
My instinct is the same as yours - I would not try to load my Grandby in 40 mph winds. I have no idea what the limit is. I suspect the camper corner structure is the limiting area, not the jack lateral load capability if you are using Reico Titan jacks.

I have a Grandby on a 2021 GMC HD truck, so i have to jack the camper quite high. I believe the truck bed floor is at 38 inches above the ground. I would probably be nervous but still load up to 10 mph. I would definitely not load at 15 mph. I tend to be conservative about this kind of stuff, though. The consequences could be catastrophic.

I checked my owners manual and it does not address this at all. The pictures all show the loading/unloading being done indoors.
 
Thanks for that Jon and for checking your owners manual. My vehicle is a Land Rover Defender 130 and so the truck bed is not quite as high as yours - about 30”- 32”. The wind is dropping a little this evening to about 15mph gusting to about 25, and that is the best it’s going to get in the next few days.
I’ll let you know how it goes.
 
If you can round up a person on each jack corner and a couple more to help. The helpers can hold the camper steady against the wind. It is always a stressful event when the camper is up on stilts and at the mercy of being toppled by elements and/or just by backing up too fast.
 
Thanks pvstoy, I was having similar thoughts, however, the wind abated into the evening and I was able to get the camper back on without too much drama - thankfully.
Should I find myself in a similar situation again, it may be an idea to have a couple of ground anchors available, similar to the photo, which could be screwed into some soft ground and secured to the legs using a rope with a truckers hitch - just an idea.
All I have to contend with now is the popping/clunking noise as the roof flexes! Anyone else get that in a strong wind?
 

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Bradders, I’ve used screw-in ground anchors to help tie off my boat when beached, and have had them pull out when there was a strong wind on the beam. We were in sandy soil, so that undoubtedly was a factor, but it’s something to be aware of.

…and congrats on getting the camper remounted.

With respect to roof noises (oil canning), that is why I sold my FWC. There is a multi page thread (and a few others) on the topic.

Link is here…
 
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Thanks for that Wandering Sage Bush. I guess I might have to experiment with a few different designs of ground anchor and find the best one.
The oil canning thread is a great read and very interesting. My son in law is a vibration engineer and very capable. I will have a chat to him and see what his take on it is.
Fortunately, the oil canning noise on mine is not excessive and I can live with it for now. However, should it get worse, I think it will have to be dealt with from inside. I’ll add something to the oil canning post if my son in law come up with something positive.
Thanks everyone for all your help and comments, from a very windy Scotland!
 
Thanks for that Wandering Sage Bush. I guess I might have to experiment with a few different designs of ground anchor and find the best one.
The oil canning thread is a great read and very interesting. My son in law is a vibration engineer and very capable. I will have a chat to him and see what his take on it is.
Fortunately, the oil canning noise on mine is not excessive and I can live with it for now. However, should it get worse, I think it will have to be dealt with from inside. I’ll add something to the oil canning post if my son in law come up with something positive.
Thanks everyone for all your help and comments, from a very windy Scotland!
Let us know what ideas you son-in-law has to rectify the oil canning...in my '16 hawk with two solar roof panels on Yakima rails the oil canning has gotten worse over time...the aluminum top sheet seems to have more distortion [slack] over time and that generates the popping/booming in heavy winds...I have experimented with different strips of material on the top sheet to damping the movement and sound but no joy yet...

Ps...If you can visit the Isle of Mull.....drop dead gorgeous! And has single malts!
 
I can tell you I've done it in 20-25knot winds and it was SKETCHY. The camper was really swaying. I told myself that I would just wait it out next time.
 
Let us know what ideas you son-in-law has to rectify the oil canning...in my '16 hawk with two solar roof panels on Yakima rails the oil canning has gotten worse over time...the aluminum top sheet seems to have more distortion [slack] over time and that generates the popping/booming in heavy winds...I have experimented with different strips of material on the top sheet to damping the movement and sound but no joy yet...

Ps...If you can visit the Isle of Mull.....drop dead gorgeous! And has single malts!
I’m back home next week Wallowa; watch this space…
 
I can tell you I've done it in 20-25knot winds and it was SKETCHY. The camper was really swaying. I told myself that I would just wait it out next time.
Yeah, I know what you mean. What I should have done is looked a bit more closely at the weather forecast before removing the camper. Every day’s a school day as they say!
 

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