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FWC roof load problem

Granby roof storage rocket Box

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#11 Wallowa

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 11:34 PM

 


"Not sure where you got that information. Lucky if you can get the roof up with 150-200 lbs.":

 

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Ah, can't help it... you threw me a slow, inside pitch, so here goes...'getting it up is not the issue'....the advertised 1,000 lb roof load max is just that a load maximum; as I understand with the top in the up position...as discussed you need to remove the snow load before raising or lowering top; not just because with 1,000 lbs on the roof  it would take the 'Hulk' to do it but that the fact that each end is lowered/raised independently of the other end and going up or down would tweak the panels and perhaps the roof structure...

 

Personally, even though we have the YakRak rails I only plan to load the roof with our FWC Zamp 160W  panel...I have two sea kayaks that I would love to haul with us but that weight [about 110 lbs total] would be more than I could push into place and again would put a lot of torque load into the roof going up or down..not to mention that putting the kayaks on the roof, especially in a wind, would be a herculean task..

 

Lastly with all the discussion about about a roof load....it is my intent to keep as much mass [weight] centered and as low as possible with my Tundra/Hawk combo...not just for handling but for side loads and stress on the Hawk when off road...piling stuff "that I just can't live without' on the top of the Hawk just doesn't make sense to me.

 

I am not knocking anyone's choices but for example expecting to use our FWCs in sub-zero weather without serious compromises or carrying motorcycles, bikes, surf boards, skis, sea kayaks, 5 gallon fuel cans, high-lift jacks etc etc festooned all over the outside of the FWC seems to me to be way outside the design parameters or reasonable expectations for our campers...we are supposed to be lightweight, relatively self-contained, low profile and highly mobile for off road adventures....at least that is my take and I could be wrong.. :)

 

Phil


Edited by Wallowa, 16 December 2018 - 12:00 AM.

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#12 DavidGraves

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 11:39 PM

We recently delivered our Old Town wood/canvas canoe up to BC and I was really surprised how much harder it was to lift the roof with only about 75 lbs added.

 

Partly, it was harder because one is on ones' knees at the rear to start the lift.

 

Yuk, I would not want to do that on a trip.

 

David Graves


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#13 Wallowa

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 12:04 AM



We recently delivered our Old Town wood/canvas canoe up to BC and I was really surprised how much harder it was to lift the roof with only about 75 lbs added.

 

Partly, it was harder because one is on ones' knees at the rear to start the lift.

 

Yuk, I would not want to do that on a trip.

 

David Graves

 

 

Curious David...which FWC?  ['being on your knees']  Either you are very tall or the designs are radically different...on my knees I could not touch the rear of the roof when it was down...easy to move around with top down...have sat at side dinette for on-road meals without raising the top...

 

Old Town wood/canvas; 17 feet?...very cool.


Edited by Wallowa, 16 December 2018 - 12:06 AM.

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#14 DavidGraves

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 12:51 AM

Hi Phil

 

On my knees inside the Hawk starting the rear roof lift.....OH NO ! Have I been doing it wrong ? :blink:

 

David Graves


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#15 PaulT

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 01:38 AM

David,

 

Not for me to say you are doing it wrong, but one try on my knees convinced me to try another approach. YMMV. ;)

 

For my front dinette Hawk, I sit on the rear passenger side bottom cabinet ledge to get it started up, then stand and finish the job. For the front, I sit on the water tank cover and passenger side seat to push. These allow me to avoid bending back for the task. Old back and old knees. Just bought a crank up speaker stand but haven't tried it as I have not found crutch tips for the top and bottom of the unit. 

 

I'm sure that the floor layout makes a difference.

Paul


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#16 DavidGraves

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 02:47 AM

Yes...we have a Hawk shell.

 

Nevertheless, I kneel in the aisle and push up on the rear roof and then rise with it till I can lock the panel back.

 

Seems to work.

 

David


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#17 Wallowa

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 04:19 PM

Yes...we have a Hawk shell.

 

Nevertheless, I kneel in the aisle and push up on the rear roof and then rise with it till I can lock the panel back.

 

Seems to work.

 

David

 

Hey, if it works that is what counts!


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#18 DavidGraves

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 05:02 PM

I have often thought that we need an image of a lifted FWC roof WITHOUT the flexible sides in place to illustrate just how fragile it all is relative to roof loading.


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#19 PackRat

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 07:23 PM

I would remove all that excess weight and see how easy/difficult it is to raise/lower the roof is. If it is still really tough to get up either your method of lifting or damage to the Hawk has occurred or both. I would suggest it might be time to invest in a trailer to tow behind your truck for all the toys you have accumulated and will probably be happy to shift to the trailer that currently hog the floor space when you arrive at a destination to set up camp.

 

I know that our various mfgers of lifting campers have/can be outfitted with roof racks but you are basically putting two good sized people up on the roof and are then expecting it to raise/lower easily and not start to cave in the roof! BAD IDEA!

 

If a trailer isn't in your future, then putting "stuff" into the truck itself or hanging it on the outside of the bed will work.

 

Or....you just need to re-evaluate what all you want to carry if the trailer isn't feasible.


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#20 Wallowa

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 07:25 PM

I have often thought that we need an image of a lifted FWC roof WITHOUT the flexible sides in place to illustrate just how fragile it all is relative to roof loading.

 

 

True that...I believe only the end panels are supporting the top, siding and any load on the top...I have no idea how those panels can hold it up; perhaps an engineer in our forum can explain it...then compound that with a 40-50 mph wind when top is up...add snow..yikes.


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