Taking the Mirrorless Plunge

Wandering Sagebrush

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Northeast Oregon
I finally decided to take the plunge and move to a Mirrorless camera. A Nikon Z7 II is on the way from Pro Photo (Portland), along with the kit 24-70/4 lens, and a F mount adapter. My DSLRs somehow have grown heavier over the years, and not as much fun to carry.

I am curious to see what another 10 megapickles will do for image quality.
 
With 45 mp resolution, Steve will be able to zoom in far enough to identify parasites living in the tiny feathers around the eye of a hummingbird and still have an image too large to post on the forum.

Perhaps, I exaggerate a little. :rolleyes: However, paraphrasing a beer commercial of old,”Where you going with all those bits?”

Looking forward to more great wildlife & landscape photos.

Paul
 
Enjoy your new toy tool Steve! May it lighten your load, put a spring in your step and reward you with lots of great memories!
 
AWG_Pics said:
Enjoy your new toy tool Steve! May it lighten your load, put a spring in your step and reward you with lots of great memories!
PaulT said:
With 45 mp resolution, Steve will be able to zoom in far enough to identify parasites living in the tiny feathers around the eye of a hummingbird and still have an image too large to post on the forum.

Perhaps, I exaggerate a little. :rolleyes: However, paraphrasing a beer commercial of old,”Where you going with all those bits?”
Looking forward to more great wildlife & landscape photos.

Paul
Tony, Paul,

Casa Escarlata Robles Too said:
This looks like about the same size as your DSLR,is it?
How mush weight difference is there?
Wow 45+ MPs
Frank
rubberlegs said:
Can you take pictures of yourself with a mirrorless camera? ;)
Thanks, everyone! The spring in my step is muchly needed, as everything I own (including me) has gained significant weight. I expect to experience a learning curve with respect to controls, ergonomics, and the electronic view finder and perhaps color settings. Hopefully, I can somewhat master those in a relatively short time.
 
My Nikon A1000 has the electronic viewfinder and it took a few uses to get used to it.
If you are using the screen to see the subject and your head gets to close it switches to the electronic one.
Takes some getting used to.
Have fun.
Post some pics.
Frank
 
Wandering Sagebrush said:
I finally decided to take the plunge and move to a Mirrorless camera. A Nikon Z7 II is on the way from Pro Photo (Portland), along with the kit 24-70/4 lens, and a F mount adapter. My DSLRs somehow have grown heavier over the years, and not as much fun to carry.

I am curious to see what another 10 megapickles will do for image quality.
I've been considering the Z6. Should I go for more megapickles? Is this like my old friend and car enthusiast always said, "There's no substitute for cubic inches?" :)
 
ski3pin said:
I've been considering the Z6. Should I go for more megapickles? Is this like my old friend and car enthusiast always said, "There's no substitute for cubic inches?" :)
Monte, read reviews on the Z6. The reviews I read (mostly from people moving to the Z7 II) were not flattering.

I believe the quote referred to cubic inches and money.
 
ski3pin said:
I've been considering the Z6. Should I go for more megapickles? Is this like my old friend and car enthusiast always said, "There's no substitute for cubic inches?" :)
I don't have a Z -- still shooting DSLRs. However, from what I have learned...

On the upside of Z7: tons of pixels to crop and play with, excellent image quality, good autofocus, in-camera image stabilization.

Downside of Z7: your computer may get constipated when processing images, more $$. (You wanted a new computer anyway, right?)
 
It’s here and in my hands. Initial observations, it’s small (really), the controls are much different than a DSLR, and the manual is wimpy compared to D series (not that they were outstanding). The differences kinda shocked me, but then I think back to my overwhelmed feeling when I bought my first D series.

YouTube tutorials are going to be my guide for a while to figure out how I want to configure controls.

Yes, I think I made the right decision by going Mirrorless.
 
I also made the switch to mirrorless.

But I am in the Canon world.

I have a Rebel T2i which is getting a bit long in the tooth.
I started researching upgrades and found I could go to the EOS RP for slightly less than a newer SLR.

I had to make a trip to Michigan for work and stopped at Procam in Livonia.
This cost me a bit more, I got the RP, the EF lens adapter, and a used 100-400L lence.
I already had a 24-105L so this sets me up very well for my future travels.

The learning curve is pretty steep, the RP is a lower point full frame body, and it has many more options to choose from.
I did learn really quickly to turn the touchscreen in when using the EVF, I would accidentally change the focus point too easily.

I will most likely find a mode that works fairly well for my use and not mess with all the other stuff much.

one feature I like is IF i start the canon app on my phone and connect it to the camera wifi it will geotag my pictures.

Another note, I tried some cheap batteries that the canon charger will not charge, then I got the OEM Canon batteries for extras. this camera does seem to go through batteries a lot faster.
 
Z7 II first uploaded image. This is on Flickr, as WTW washes out the color. Lots of learning yet. Image size is huge 34x24.

52443879074_356b4d76b2_b.jpg
 
Update on the Z7 II.

It’s a nice camera, but it is very small. I’ve ordered the grip to help with the fit to my hands. I never thought I had big hands, but after having to buy XXL gloves, and the grip for handheld photography. I guess I’m related to Sasquatch.

For trail work, I’ll remove the grip, and use my Peak Designs Capture Clip (shout out to Mr 3Pin for the recommendation!).

What I’m finding most irritating in the learning curve is the controls that used to be on the left side of the display, are now on the right, meaning I have to take my thumb off the AF-On button to hit things like display zoom and menu.

Overall, I still like it.
 
I jump back and forth between my Fuji mirrorless and my Nikon DSLR. The button layout and controls get really confusing sometimes especially since I use the Fuji much more frequently. Eventually I will be in Nikon Mirrorless camp but that is a number of years down the road at this point but having both systems is sort of entertaining, I'm looking forward to picking up the new XT-5 with 40mp maybe early next year.
 
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