Inflatable kayak

We bought a Tributary Strike2 inflatable. It can be used solo or tandem. One of the reasons was wanting a durable boat that weighs under 50# for flying to Alaska and the boat being fairly bulletproof from leaks on longer wilderness trips. Can put a skeg on it for tracking. I am sure that lot's of the boats mentioned will work, just depends on what you are looking for all around. We have a larger welded step for the camper that the boat can be strapped onto whilst traveling.
 
Just ordered an Aquaglide Chelan Tandem XL HB from airkayaks.com. They were a joy to work with and the boat/pump and paddles should be here by the weekend. Looking forward to taking it along on trips with the camper as well as being able to explore some local waterways. Might even look at doing a self-contained trip down the San Juan with it in the near future.
 
First trip with our Advanced Element kayak. We bought the Island Voyage model, it is well made with welded seams, quality boston valves, replaceable air bladders inside fairly heavy canvas/pvc fabric tubes. Takes right at 4 minutes to inflate. The inflation pressure recommended is enough to make the boat very rigid. paddles very wll but doesn't not have the glide distance of a hard kayak when you stop paddling. All in all I'm very pleased with our purchase. Lists for 399. but found it at REI on sale for 20% off. P.S. Not covinced kayak paddles are best, going to try using my canoe paddles next time.
 
Got the boat out twice over the weekend. Saturday with two of us for a flatwater get comfortable session and Sunday we took two of the dogs on some moving water down the Salt River. Saw a few bands of horses during the float as well.
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ok, I know this is old posts, but I'm looking at a sea eagle 370 an wonder if anyone ON here uses ONE, an give me some imput!! not looking for a "different better unit" just looking for your INPUT! junk or ok.thanks
 
Just a heads up.... when selecting an inflatable kayak it may make sense to keep in mind the Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) regulations in the various states that you may plan to paddle in. We have Advanced Elements, Advanced Frame models that we bought several years ago that measure 10'-5" long. In both Oregon and Washington, AIS regulations treat watercraft (including inflatable kayaks) over 10 feet long as being subject to meeting the regs. (Somehow the invasive species differentiate between boats that measure 9'-11" and those like ours that are slightly longer :)

There are of course fees for getting AIS certified in many states and if your craft has been in any infected waters in the last month you may be required to pay to have your kayak professionally cleaned. The regulations are also constantly being changed. When we went to the Pacific Northwest a few years ago to kayak it was no problem, just a quick inspection on the side of a highway. On our last trip up through Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana last month we just left the kayaks at home rather than deal with the fees, paperwork and inspections that vary from state to state.

It's a shame that the states can't get on the same page on this but I guess that would keep some bureaucrats from milking this situation. IMHO, the AIS will get everywhere eventually, much like Covid.

IOW, when shopping, I would now be looking at kayaks shorter than 10 feet even though some states exclude kayaks completely.
 
Thanks for that info Dave. That is exactly why I sold my canoe.
It became a pain to just drive down the road with it on top of the camper.

I also have a Advanced Elements duel kayak "frame" model
but mine is 15' long. Don't get a chance to use it much.In fact haven't in
several years.

I am all for the halting of invasive critters BUT. It would be nice for all states to
be on the same page.

Frank
 
Here is a link to the Aquatic Invasive Species network: https://www.westernais.org/regional

The reasons for different approaches in different jurisdictions has as much to do with geography and hydrology as it does with procedures to inspect boats. Usually each state legislature mandates the state agencies cooperate with but not cede jurisdiction to another entity (Tribal, State or Federal).

Consider the standards for Washington state differ from say Idaho for many reasons, not the least of which Washington has a ocean coast to consider and the Columbia River in Oregon and Washington has low potential for a start (but not transmission) of infection from invasive mussels due to the wrong water chemistry.

I could go on, but the website above will flood you with information that is more credible than my memory.
 
AWG_Pics said:
Here is a link to the Aquatic Invasive Species network: https://www.westernais.org/regional

The reasons for different approaches in different jurisdictions has as much to do with geography and hydrology as it does with procedures to inspect boats. Usually each state legislature mandates the state agencies cooperate with but not cede jurisdiction to another entity (Tribal, State or Federal).

Consider the standards for Washington state differ from say Idaho for many reasons, not the least of which Washington has a ocean coast to consider and the Columbia River in Oregon and Washington has low potential for a start (but not transmission) of infection from invasive mussels due to the wrong water chemistry.

I could go on, but the website above will flood you with information that is more credible than my memory.
FYI, my list of AIS infected waters that came attached to the affidavit form includes the Columbia in both Oregon and Washington as well as, well, just about everywhere. If your watercraft has been in any of the waters listed within the last 30 days, it is assumed to be harboring AIS. The list includes:

"Canada
Eastern USA
The Great Lakes
Idaho
Midwestern USA
Montana
Wyoming"

Also: most decent size lakes and rivers in California, every big river in Oregon,the Snake, Lakes Mead, Havasu and Powell, Topaz Lake, all of the Colorado, etc, etc. For some reason there are only three in Texas.
 
There are invasive species of all sorts from "rock snot" to Asian crabs. But some are much worse than others. Quagga and Zebra mussels, and northern pike, have the potential to deal a knock out blow to some infrastructure and programs. Every waterway is plagued by invasives. But it is still worth trying to keep Quaggas and Zebra mussels out of the Columbia. Worth hundreds of millions of dollars, actually. Northern Pike are already in the upper Columbia and threaten salmon recovery efforts in a very real way.
 

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