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Hawk on a Tundra?

Hawk Tundra

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#11 BobD

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 12:26 AM

Thanks for all the input guys.  I think we're just going to bite the bullet and go 3/4 ton out of the gates.  I'm knee deep in mods to my Tacoma and really don't need/want to start another build at this point.  Will update when we find the truck/Hawk combo.  Again, thanks for the wisdom and insight, priceless!


Edited by BobD, 13 February 2020 - 12:53 AM.

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2010 Tacoma DCLB   2012 FWC Eagle

2017 F350 4x4 -  Super Doody Flushed

2019 DCLB Tundra - 2012 FWC Granby


#12 fish more

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 04:17 AM

Smart move to 3/4 ton, safer, bigger brakes, and need not worry about weight. I had my Hawk on a Ford F-150, it handled the camper and payload, but I felt while towing my boat, I needed more brakes while driving around in the Sierras. You will not regret going to 3/4 ton


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#13 Lighthawk

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 07:12 AM

We've certainly put our 2006 Tundra/Hawk through the paces, with air bags, swaybar and good shocks, running BFG KOs. We travel heavy, with cast iron skillet and a full kit. It's worked well for ten years.

Handling and power are excellent. Mileage isn't great at 12-15mpg, and brakes lack crisp response in an emergency stop. I enjoy driving this rig, and with 12" clearance, w we're able to access less crowded locations.
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Andy
06 Tundra AC TRD 4x4, 08 Hawk, Ride-Rite bags, Helweg sway bar,18" BFG AT's

2021 RAM 3500 Crew 4x4, 4.11 diff, Timbrens, 08 Hawk, Falken Wildpeak 35"
http://lighthawkphoto.com

 


#14 BobD

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 12:48 AM

Smart move to 3/4 ton, safer, bigger brakes, and need not worry about weight. I had my Hawk on a Ford F-150, it handled the camper and payload, but I felt while towing my boat, I needed more brakes while driving around in the Sierras. You will not regret going to 3/4 ton

 

 

We've certainly put our 2006 Tundra/Hawk through the paces, with air bags, swaybar and good shocks, running BFG KOs. We travel heavy, with cast iron skillet and a full kit. It's worked well for ten years.

Handling and power are excellent. Mileage isn't great at 12-15mpg, and brakes lack crisp response in an emergency stop. I enjoy driving this rig, and with 12" clearance, w we're able to access less crowded locations.

Thanks guys, the more advice the better.

 

I remember Lighthawk's posts from when I had my Eagle.  Good to see you're still enjoying your truck/camper setup.

 

It's brand loyalty and satisfaction that has us coming back to a FWC setup.


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2010 Tacoma DCLB   2012 FWC Eagle

2017 F350 4x4 -  Super Doody Flushed

2019 DCLB Tundra - 2012 FWC Granby


#15 forrestthorniley

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Posted 20 February 2020 - 08:59 PM

I wouldn't put an FWC Hawk on anything less than a F-350 with the Tremor package. Anything else would be uncivilized.

 

Ina ll seriousness though I love my Hawk Tundra combo, though I did put several thousand in suspension upgrades in (including a lift and 35 tires). Expensive but not bad considering what 3/4 or 1 ton goes for these days. I like having Toyota reliability and cost of ownership. 


Edited by forrestthorniley, 20 February 2020 - 09:01 PM.

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#16 CamperCamper

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Posted 23 February 2020 - 05:07 PM

I have a 2015 Tundra DBL CAB. First use was to carry a 2014 Hawk slide-in. Upgrade then was rear sway bar, extra rear leaf spring, E rated tires and air bags to balance it all out. Loved it! Second use was to build a flatbed and place a Hawk Flatbed model on it. Upgrade for this was complete OME suspension with two additional leaf springs. Loved it even more.

The truck has tires rotated every 5k miles. The odometer is at 59k and I rotate 5 Michelin 275/65/18E tires. They are the original tires and still show 12/32 of tread depth remaining on the original tires. The oil is changed every 5k miles too and every component is inspected at that time. I am still on the original pads and rotors and they show over 60% pad remaining and no warping on the rotors.

If I was to start over today, I would choose the Tundra again! The rear axel is manufactured by Hino (Toyota Group subsidiary). The rear axel is the same as used in the medium duty trucks manufactured for Japan and Europe. Hino rates this axel at 5500 lbs with a failure rate at 50% over that or right about 8000 lbs. My conclusion is that the 4150 rear GAWR from Toyota is more a function of the P rated tire placed on the truck when built (to provide the American market a cushy ride) than the axel or brakes. The load capacity of the P rated tire is right in line with that rating. Substituting an E rated tire inflated to 80 psi gives you a 5,460 lb working load per tire! Add in the upgraded suspension to “hold up” the load and you keep the front end planted on the ground instead of lifting the weight off of the steering wheels. Throw in some weight up front with a good off road bumper and winch and you improve that distribution too.

But why Toyota? It is a full sized truck that will last “forever”. It is built on a much shorter wheelbase and overall length than the domestic models. The turning radius is tighter, the ground clearance is higher and the angles of approach and departure are better too. If you want to be off road with your truck and camper, then this is the platform to start with in my opinion.

I fully expect this post to bring the “GVW Police” out in full force. I get a lot of amusement by reading all of the dire warnings repeated ad nauseum from these enforcement officers! It seems to me to be more often a repeat of another warning read elsewhere than backed by actual research. Did you know that the modifications mentioned above would allow me to get a new GVW sticker in Australia? The most amusement for me comes from a realization that while most of us here in America constantly rant about wanting less government interference in our lives, it seems to me that the same government interference is OK when it is directed at someone other than ourselves.

Thank you for reading my Sunday morning rant.

This rig is now for sale. You can see it here: https://www.HawkFlatbed.com

Edited by CamperCamper, 23 February 2020 - 05:12 PM.

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#17 greenerdreams

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Posted 11 March 2020 - 05:56 AM

have a 2010 loaded hawk on a 2013 tundra double cab with 5.7,  stock tires and super sacs on the rear.  truck handles the  camper great, especially compared to our old truck, a 2004 f150 crew cab with the 5.4.  without the super sacs it would bottom on many things easily, now it rides well.  I don't notice the weight on the engine and the brakes are not a problem.  we have driven on many multi thousand mile trips.  Obviously a heavier duty truck would notice it even less, but i feel it is not a necessity.


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#18 AWG_Pics

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Posted 13 March 2020 - 04:38 PM

We just returned yesterday from a 3750 mile road trip, of which about 150 miles were in 4WD, often 4WD Lo. Death Valley alluvial fans into the canyons (Marble, Warm Springs, Johnson and Trail) are nothing trivial, and we crossed lots of mountain passes. I am happy to report our Tundra/Hawk combo made the journey with no problems at all. Occasionally I tightened the turnbuckles, but that is normal for any of us. We did not travel light, most of the time with a full load, full gas tank and full water supply, as well as lots of other stuff, including approx 10 gallons of extra water.

 

I don't feel any need for a 3/4 ton truck. Others differ and that is fine. Each to their own.


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lived for several years each in Montana, Utah, Idaho, Texas, Washington, Oregon.

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#19 BBZ

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Posted 13 March 2020 - 04:49 PM

lots of good advice here.. 

 

I think the simple way to look at it is.. are you looking to travel light? if so, go 1/2 ton..

 

If you want to travel with a really fully loaded hawk, go 3/4 ton.. 

 

We built a Grandby from the frame to be as light as possible.. 900 ish lbs.. When loaded for a month long trip we are under gross vehicle weight with 2 adults (small adults to be honest) and 2 dogs.  We have a 1/2 ton truck, just airbags/tires and hardly notice the camper

 

Other factor to consider.. do you need the truck for more than the camper? I need one for work and don't want to deal with a 3/4 ton as they ride like crap empty.. 


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2016 F-150 Scab HDPP + 2013 Grandby Shell +

 

https://www.wanderth...ect-90s-granby/

 

 


#20 BlueSky

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Posted 15 March 2020 - 03:24 PM

I have a 2008 Tundra DC 4x4 with an ATC Cougar (similar in size to Granby).  I have Sumo springs (rather than air bags) and E-rated Cooper tires. Camper has heater, sink, stove, 15 gal water tank. The E-rated tires made a big difference in handling, so that is a must.  With wife, two kids, canoe, 4 bikes, and the regular gear, firewood etc., we are loaded for bear when we leave the house.  Living in CO you have some serious hills and traffic to deal with, and then there is the snow and ice in June. Then there is the off-road stuff I like to do that totally freaks out my wife.  Compared to the speeding 18 wheelers, huge old RV's, gigantic 5th wheels, and mini vans with piles of stuff strapped to the top, I am the safest thing on the road.  If after loading up you find your truck is squatting, you'll need to fix that. Use the tow/haul function when climbing/descending big hills. Down shift to go easy on the brakes on downgrades. Keep it under 70mph on the long straight freeways.  See there are all these other things that really add up.  I am sure a 3/4 ton truck would give me some extra margin of safety, and I think I'm that much extra careful and patient driving the Tundra. I love my truck btw. I could easily sell it and go buy a new 3/4 ton long bed, but I personally don't need to. I know guys that would soil their panties driving my truck with camper and all the gear.  You have to know yourself and driving competence.  We're all remarkably different.


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