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Recovery jack comparison

jacks recovery

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#1 JHanson

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Posted 24 November 2021 - 12:17 AM

Anyone who is contemplating buying a recovery jack but is undecided which one to get might find this article useful. I've used them all in the field, and gave them all a fair shake.

 

Cheers,

 

Jonathan

 

51700845811_d70768b98d_z.jpg


Edited by JHanson, 28 November 2021 - 06:02 PM.

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#2 Lighthawk

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Posted 24 November 2021 - 02:06 AM

Great article to get our attention, especially with reference to a FWC camper adding to the truck's overall weight.

 

 

I just picked up a Toyota jack on Ebay for my second jack for $56 shipped.   Model 09111-35150 - 1500kg - 3310lb - Earlier 4Runner.

Truck weighs 7000lb and dry camper weighs 1827lb wet.  I haven't weighed the rig on a CAT scale, but would guess the the majority of the unloaded weight of the truck is with the motor up front.  With food, beer, passengers and a dog I'm guessing our total weight approaches 10,000lb.  GVWR for the RAM 3500 is 11,000lb.  

 

These mechanical Toyota jacks are great, and my Tundra jack has been deployed a number of times..  They collapse to 9" but extend to 16",  w/o any hydraulic fluid to leak out.  I had a Zing neoprene sling (for a DSLR) that worked perfectly to cover the jack, and I was able to fit it under the front passenger seat next to the RAM OEM mechanical jack.   I also carry a Hi-Lift jack, mounted to the Hawk designed and welded by Camelracer.  

 

Those Humvee scissor jacks look like another useful alternative.  Thanks for the informative article, Jonathan.  


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Andy
06 Tundra AC TRD 4x4, 08 Hawk, Ride-Rite bags, Helweg sway bar,18" BFG AT's

2021 RAM 3500 Crew 4x4, 4.10 gears, Timbrens, 08 Hawk, Falken Wildpeak 35"
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#3 Old Crow

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Posted 24 November 2021 - 06:46 PM

I'm glad to see the Humvee M998/Hummer H1 jack with adapter mentioned, particularly the part about the wobble... I had been wondering about that.

 

Last June I switched from carrying a 3-ton aluminum racing jack (swapping it back and forth between travel rigs) to the 3.5-ton Humvee jack with adapter.  I had noticed that adapter on the Agile Offroad web site while looking for Transit stuff and happened to have a Humvee jack I had been given a few years ago.  I balked at the adapter's price tag but then convinced myself that averaging the cost of the jack (free) with the cost of the adapter ($105 with shipping) made it OK.  A few weeks ago I acquired another Humvee jack and adapter for the Tundra/Hawk rig.

 

Raising and lowering the Humvee jack is a bit frustrating as it seems to take a long, long time to raise and lower.  I've used a 5/8" socket driven by a power-driver to speed that up here at home but don't usually carry that power-driver on the road.

 

I also have a Bushranger X-jack I bought off Ebay a few years ago but don't really like it.  I had problems keeping it under the truck's frame while testing here in the driveway.  It also seems big and clumsy to deal with and to haul around.  If I were planning a trip where I might be in a lot of deep sand, I'd probably opt to take it along.

 

.


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'01 FWC Hawk shell on a '13 Tundra Double-Cab  + '19 Ford Transit van with Quigley 4x4 option


#4 Mighty Dodge Ram

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Posted 25 November 2021 - 04:20 PM

I’ve switched to a 3-ton floor jack, I may look at a skid plate arrangement for it. If I bury a tire I’m hoping that a shovel and MaxTrax can lift the truck enough to slide the jack underneath. That being said, I found JHanson’s latest article very informative. 


Edited by Mighty Dodge Ram, 25 November 2021 - 04:22 PM.

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Richard
1996 Dodge Ram 1500 4x4, lightly lifted, ARB bumper/Warn winch, BFG AT/KO2, Snugtop shell. SOLD! But not forgotten!
2002 Chevy 2500HD XC LB 6.0L 4X4, Leer Hi-Rise shell, completely stock...for now!

#5 heinphoto

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Posted 27 November 2021 - 05:58 PM

Thanks for this - it is one of the upgrades I still need to do (still relying on the OEM jack in our F350).


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#6 michelle_east_county

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Posted 27 November 2021 - 07:23 PM

Thanks for this - it is one of the upgrades I still need to do (still relying on the OEM jack in our F350).

Other than greater lift height from high-lift jacks (but unsafe for tire changing), what's the advantage of those or others over OEM?
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#7 heinphoto

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Posted 27 November 2021 - 08:05 PM

Other than greater lift height from high-lift jacks (but unsafe for tire changing), what's the advantage of those or others over OEM?

I mainly worry about the weight rating of the OEM jack with the fully loaded camper. I believe it has a 2-ton rating, which doesn't give much safety margin, so I feel a little exposed.


Edited by heinphoto, 27 November 2021 - 09:10 PM.

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FWC Grandby on a Ford F350 Supercab with the 6.2L Gas Engine.

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#8 JHanson

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Posted 28 November 2021 - 06:01 PM

Other than greater lift height from high-lift jacks (but unsafe for tire changing), what's the advantage of those or others over OEM?

As Scott Hein mentioned, factory jacks are generally barely adequate to lift an empty truck, much less one at or near GVWR. You're right that the Hi-Lift is not the best choice for tire-changing duty.


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#9 Machinebuilder

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Posted 29 November 2021 - 06:13 PM

I carry this one

 

https://www.northern...41736_200641736

 

10" of travel and not too big,

 

I never trusted the OEM screw jacks.

 

 

 


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#10 craig333

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Posted 29 November 2021 - 09:35 PM

I like that one. I might upgrade my current hydraulic jack. 

 

I wouldn't change a tire with a hi lift if I had a choice. One nice thing about the Jeep. There is almost no spot you can't use the lift on. 


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Craig K6JGV_________________________ 2004 2500 CTD 4X4 FWC HAWK 1960 CJ5






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