Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Unvented Gas Heaters


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#11 Dughlas Stiubhart

Dughlas Stiubhart

    It's good to be Stew

  • Members
  • 1,474 posts
  • LocationSE CO

Posted 09 September 2010 - 03:03 PM

Electric quartz heaters: not quite on subject, but we carry a Pelonis Basic at all times. I think they are pretty safe. The only concern is placing it too close to something flamable. If we are leaving it on all night, we might put it on top of the stove, for safety, and where my heater can reach the switch on it.

Cook stove (unvented): If you light the cook stove, this will heat up the inside of the camper very quickly.

In conclusion, please consider not using unvented gas heaters, especially inside tiny campers. _John D


John D,

I too use a 110 quartz heater when (not often) I'm on shore power during the winter and there are no fumes produced so running all night is no problem. As you say, putting it in a safe place is important.

Running the cook stove unvented is not very safe, however. They put off more dangerous fumes (CO for one) than a propane catalytic and have no auto shut-off when the O2 gets low. If you want to run the cook stove for heat, I would be sure a window and a roof vent are open.

Stew

PS: I think I saw your FWC/ATC being rebuilt in early 2007 at the ATC shop. Is that correct??
  • 0

Stew

 

2007 Custom All Terrain Camper Panther Shell on 2012 Toyota Tundra 4x4 in SE CO


#12 home skillet

home skillet

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 256 posts
  • LocationWenatchee, WA

Posted 10 September 2010 - 01:48 AM

Thanks for the thoughts John D. You have a valid point with the forced air heater being so affordable. I will give some thought in my current build. My only concern is that it is a bit of space pig and the fuel consumption to BTU output isn't as good as a catalytic. Hmmmmm. I'll give it more thought.
  • 0

Drive far away then stand in the water slinging bugs


#13 Barko1

Barko1

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1,635 posts
  • LocationSouthern Appalachians

Posted 10 September 2010 - 10:08 PM

As long as the Wave heaters have O2 your fine. I keep the side window cracked, a top window the same, and the vent open a bit and let the heater run all night. $500 for the other heater isn't bad but they consume DC and waste a lot of heat out the exhaust. The thermostat heaters are more convenient than a Wave but the Wave beats it on small/simple/efficient/quiet.
  • 0
Granby on an F250 in S. NM

#14 Dughlas Stiubhart

Dughlas Stiubhart

    It's good to be Stew

  • Members
  • 1,474 posts
  • LocationSE CO

Posted 11 September 2010 - 03:20 PM

As long as the Wave heaters have O2 your fine. I keep the side window cracked, a top window the same, and the vent open a bit and let the heater run all night. $500 for the other heater isn't bad but they consume DC and waste a lot of heat out the exhaust. The thermostat heaters are more convenient than a Wave but the Wave beats it on small/simple/efficient/quiet.


Barko, is your Wave wall-mounted or on legs?

Stew
  • 0

Stew

 

2007 Custom All Terrain Camper Panther Shell on 2012 Toyota Tundra 4x4 in SE CO


#15 craig333

craig333

    Riley's Human

  • Members
  • 6,405 posts
  • LocationSacramento

Posted 11 September 2010 - 04:02 PM

Don't let fuel efficiency stop you from getting a forced air heater. They really don't use that much. I don't fill my tank more than once a season.

Even with the forced air heater I still leave a vent open, just to help vent any moisture.
  • 0
Craig KK6AUI _________________________ 2004 2500 CTD 4X4 FWC HAWK 1960 CJ5

#16 home skillet

home skillet

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 256 posts
  • LocationWenatchee, WA

Posted 11 September 2010 - 05:30 PM

As long as the Wave heaters have O2 your fine. I keep the side window cracked, a top window the same, and the vent open a bit and let the heater run all night. $500 for the other heater isn't bad but they consume DC and waste a lot of heat out the exhaust. The thermostat heaters are more convenient than a Wave but the Wave beats it on small/simple/efficient/quiet.


Do you think the wave is better than the Olympian?
  • 0

Drive far away then stand in the water slinging bugs


#17 banderswipe

banderswipe

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 174 posts
  • LocationOntario Canada

Posted 11 September 2010 - 05:45 PM

I am thinking about becoming a Moron so i can legally have more than one space heater. One for the camper and the one I already have that doesn't like camping. Unfortunately the one I already have might use my Remington pump on me.
Life is never easy.

Cheers.

Kevin.
  • 0
Keep your eyes on the road and your hands upon the wheel and always have some body help you load or unload your camper.

#18 MarkBC

MarkBC

    The Weatherman

  • Site Team
  • 5,764 posts
  • LocationBend, Oregon

Posted 11 September 2010 - 07:16 PM

Don't let fuel efficiency stop you from getting a forced air heater. They really don't use that much. I don't fill my tank more than once a season.

Even with the forced air heater I still leave a vent open, just to help vent any moisture.

Yeah, I agree about the built-in forced-air heater. It may not be the most efficient, but that's not a practical problem -- a 5 gal propane tank still lasts a long time. A bigger issue for me is the electricity needed to run the fan. That is a significant drain and an issue if you're in one spot for more than a couple days and not re-charging the battery.

Since the combustion in the built-in furnace isn't connected to the camper interior at all (it draws oxygen from outside and exhausts outside) it doesn't require any open windows/vents.

Do you think the wave is better than the Olympian?

The Wave (3 or 6) is a model of the Olympian company.
  • 0
FWC Hawk (2005) on a Ford F250 Supercab, 6.8L gas (2000)

#19 John D

John D

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 462 posts
  • LocationSoutheast

Posted 11 September 2010 - 11:01 PM

Stew,

Yes, our Keystone was rebuilt by ATC. We bought it from them, sight unseen, after they had rebuilt it. We could not be happier with it and it has served us well camping all over the lower 48, Canada and Alaska. One thing ATC did which some folks would be interested in was modifying the floor pac so this older model Keystone (about 1985 model) would fit later model trucks. We are currently driving a 1999 Ford F-150 with a 60 inch wide opening at the tailgate. This rebuilt Keystone fits, or I should say, the truck fits it like a glove. Anyone wanting to modify an older camper to fit modern trucks should contact Marty at ATC.

Interestingly, the Turtle Expedition used a Keytone on one of their expedition trucks. Apparently, they modified their truck so it would fit their older Keystone. That is not a bad idea because the beds of all the trucks I have measured are wider at the front than the tail gate opening. I gather the Turtle Expedition folks wanted a snug fit over its full length of the camper, perhaps for greater security and flexibility. I think I will open a new thread on that.

Back to the subject of unvented gas heaters; our gas cook stove started me thinking about the danger of unvented heaters. When we use the cook stove (for cooking or heating water), I am very aware of the fumes and the heat. Without a vent, the cook stove quickly makes the inside of the camper warm and stuffy. A vent is obviously needed, unless the weather is quite cold or the stove is on for just a short time. This is why I wrote what I did because an unvented gas heater is nearly the same thing.

A good way to use the forced air gas furnace is to set the thermostat to about 50 degrees. It will come on only a few times during the night. This will normally not run down the battery and will provide enough heat to keep the moisture out of the camper. It really does add to the comfort factor, to sleep in a dry place. When shore power is available, the quartz heater provides the same benefit. I don't think an unvented gas heater is quite as effective in driving moisture out. However, I could be wrong about that and I wish someone with a lot of experience with unvented gas heaters would comment.

Kevin,

I agree, only a moron would sleep with two women, both armed with shotguns. You are a brave man. Check your post, was the use of the word Moron a Freudian Slip?

John D
  • 0

#20 Barko1

Barko1

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 1,635 posts
  • LocationSouthern Appalachians

Posted 15 September 2010 - 10:11 PM

Barko, is your Wave wall-mounted or on legs?

Stew


Sorry for the delay, on the road. Mine is on the optional legs and connected to where the old furnace connected but with 6' of flex line propane hose. It sits on the floor when traveling and I just rotate it into the aisle in front of the door when I need heat. I have been using it regularly this week,in the Canadian Maritimes, and and pleased with it. Fires right up, no sounds, and I have been running it all night and regulating the internal temps by how much venting I open. I think it says it is 99% efficient so I feel fine keeping it warmer in here. Hasn't been all that cold, not freezing but quite cool, some daytime 40's, and wet. With the conventional unit whenever I heard it running I'd worry about 12v consumption, now I just stay toasty :D
Doesn't seem to be draining the propane. And at these temps it has only been on low, it starts warming things up right away but I think full heat takes a bit to develop.
  • 0
Granby on an F250 in S. NM




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users