Weather Warning - SoCal and NV Rain Event

Wandering Sagebrush

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This coming week (8/20-21) is going to be extremely wet in the desert areas of So California and Nevada. Check the weather reports for the areas you might be thinking of visiting. Furnace Creek is forecasted to get about 4”.
 
I read that Yuma AZ could get 5”. What I think will be really interesting is that the east-facing mountain slopes should get hit harder than west-facing slopes, reversing the usual rain shadow of coastal ranges. That might result in some significant erosion in places. But all that cool stuff aside, … ditto Wandering Sagebrush: stay safe!
 
Could be a good opportunity to earn a Darwin award with weather like that in Death Valley.

Perhaps, rescheduling after the storm is done would be wise.

Paul
 
Welcome to the East Coaster's world of tropical storm warnings. I just read this is the first such warning from NOAA to Sou Cal?
 
Looks like parts of NE & SE Oregon are in the path, too. I was planning on a Steens trip tomorrow, but perhaps a reschedule is in order.

IMG_0950.jpeg
 
Foy said:
Welcome to the East Coaster's world of tropical storm warnings. I just read this is the first such warning from NOAA to Sou Cal?
I was just imagining how people from the east and gulf coasts might look at the rain totals and think, “that’s nothing!” But in a lot of these areas there’s almost no vegetation holding the soils in place (compared with the coasts, anyway) and they’re looking at 48 hour rainfalls exceeding what they usually get in a year. I’m expecting some pretty significant erosion. On which note, I’ve often wondered about how water erosion has formed a lot of our desert landscapes. Specifically, is erosion dominated by normal seasonal precipitation or by rare, cataclysmic storms? I suspect the latter, but I’m not sure how that hypothesis could be tested. Any geologists out there?
 
Unless something dramatically changes this afternoon this storm is likely to go down as one of biggest, best hyped nothing burgers in Mono County history.
 
We have a steady rain here at Fort Sagebrush



Flood Watch
Flood Watch
National Weather Service Boise ID
557 AM MDT Mon Aug 21 2023

.Expect Record setting rainfall today across the region
associated with the remnants of Tropical Storm Hilary. This will
likely produce flash flooding, rock slides and debris flows.

IDZ011-013-033-ORZ062-220000-
/O.CON.KBOI.FA.A.0004.000000T0000Z-230823T0300Z/
/00000.0.ER.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.OO/
West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-Upper Weiser River-Baker
County-
Including the cities of McCall, Cascade, Idaho City, Lowman,
Garden Valley, Pine, Council, Cambridge, Midvale, and Baker
557 AM MDT Mon Aug 21 2023 /457 AM PDT Mon Aug 21 2023/

...FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT THROUGH TUESDAY EVENING...

* WHAT...Flash flooding caused by excessive rainfall continues to be
possible. Up to 3" of rainfall is possible this morning especially
across Baker County in Oregon as well as Washington and Adams
Counties in Idaho.

* WHERE...Portions of west central Idaho, including the following
areas, Boise Mountains, Upper Weiser River and West Central
Mountains. Portions of northeast Oregon, including the following
area, Baker County.

* WHEN...Through Tuesday evening.

* IMPACTS...Excessive runoff may result in flooding of creeks,
streams, and other low-lying and flood-prone locations. Flooding
may occur in poor drainage and urban areas. Low-water crossings
may be flooded. Storm drains and ditches may become clogged with
debris. Extensive street flooding and flooding of creeks and
rivers are possible.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...
- http://www.weather.gov/safety/flood

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action
should Flash
 
The weather folks were showing the radar. Scattered showers over the area followed with a story on a wind driven grass fire. I have a feeling we won't see much of the damage for a while yet. Until people get into the backcountry and see what's been washed out.
 
craig333 said:
The weather folks were showing the radar. Scattered showers over the area followed with a story on a wind driven grass fire. I have a feeling we won't see much of the damage for a while yet. Until people get into the backcountry and see what's been washed out.
Per NOA, DVNP Is closed, including 190. Washouts reported.
 
Camarillo, inland/coastal SoCal. 3.29" of rain since midday yesterday, high winds but no major issues in our neighborhood. Conejo Creek (about 300 yards from us) and Arroyo Las Posas both ran strong but did not breach their banks. Good to go.

Now...the 5.1 earthquake that shook the hell outta us, that's another story. LOL :cool:
 
Wandering Sagebrush said:
I hope that is the case.
South of Bishop is a mess (395 is closed) but it seems Mono County was north and west enough to be spared. It rained lightly but steadily much of the night - the louder sound was simply the roof dripping. We got substantially more rain (and a more dramatic river rise) during a thunderstorm just a couple of days ago. (It is interesting that the emergency information portal for the county alters the scale for the river gauge so it looks more severe)

After several days of emergency alerts and being on call to help sandbag I can't help but chuckle a little. I mean - fires, floods, earthquakes (had a 3.2 yesterday) epic and unexpected snowstorms - Walker has earned the title "The Disaster Capital of Mono County" but we dodged the bullet this time. I delayed my bread baking after a warning of power outages . I also delayed a backpacking trip and I am still rather sour about the 6-10 inches of forecast snow that magically became 38 inches in January, '21 so feel free to ignore my sardonic mood.

If the hype kept people safer it is a good thing but I worry about a boy who cried wolf reaction from a lot of the folks around here.
 
Julie and I just returned home from an extended adventure. We learned from a friend that the remnants of the hurricane/tropical storm produced a severe wind event here that ripped several fruit laden branches off two of our peach trees. I will survey and work on the damage in the morning. If I go look now I will not be able to sleep tonight.
 
ski3pin said:
Julie and I just returned home from an extended adventure. We learned from a friend that the remnants of the hurricane/tropical storm produced a severe wind event here that ripped several fruit laden branches off two of our peach trees. I will survey and work on the damage in the morning. If I go look now I will not be able to sleep tonight.
additionally, the severe wind event at the local reservoir separated the marina docks from their moorings. Boats and docks floated away.
 

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